University of Waterloo PhD in sustainability management

Last Updated on December 24, 2022

The PhD in Sustainability Management prepares future sustainability innovators with interdisciplinary research skills, management approaches, strategies and processes to realize sustainable outcomes with business, government and third sector organizations.

Students contribute to the creation of academic knowledge by developing methods, systems, concepts, and tools for sustainability management. Data and analysis consider environmental, social and governance areas in sustainable development.

Read on to get more information on University Of Waterloo PhD In Sustainability Management, phd sustainable development canada, phd in sustainable development uk, sustainability management university of toronto, and other related articles here at infolearners.

phd in sustainable business

The PhD program in Business Administration for Sustainable Development has three different concentrations; namely Finance, Marketing, and Management. This is a research-oriented program designed to prepare students for professions in the academic and business community. The program is an intensive course of study in the theory and empiric of Finance, Marketing, and Management.

The coursework is designed to introduce the student to all basic areas of concentration; however the responsibility for grasping the material lies with the student. To be successful in this program, the student must be committed to the highest level of academic achievement. A combination of classroom instruction, seminars, independent studies and individual work with faculty prepares the student for continued research in their areas of concentration.

The PhD program can be completed in three years for full-time students taking classes in the Spring, Summer and Fall semesters, however, students are allowed to go above three years in the program but cannot exceed five years. They are required to complete at least 54 credit hours selected from a list of core, required, and elective courses offered. Student may also receive credits for research work, if this work is of high scientific quality (i.e. in principle publishable) and is not related to the thesis work of the student.

The course load will consist of the following:

  • Completion of Coursework
  • Doctoral degree comprehensive examination
  • Submission/Publication of three peer reviewed journal and three conference articles (facilitated through one-to-one mentoring of ICT-U faculty members)
  • Scientific (theory-driven) thesis/dissertation
  • Public Defense of thesis/dissertation
COURSE FRAMEWORK:
  • ICT Research Seminars (15 hours)
  • Courses in Area of Concentration (27 hours) (Manuscript development)
  • Quantitative Research Methods/Statistics (6 hours)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (6 hours)

Department Contact Info

Engineering & Business

P.O. Box 526, Zoatupsi
Yaounde, Cameroon

 +237 651 060 049
[email protected]

Mon – Fri 9:00A.M. – 5:00P.M.

Why Study Here?

The Academic offers include 14 majors, 15 minors, and more than 100 in major specializations so your degree will surely reflect your interests and strengths.

Not only does ICT University provide you the practical skills that is necessary to transition seamlessly into the workforce upon your graduation, but we also make sure that you will have a good sense of social justice so that you make the transition responsibly.

Students and faculty in the Sustainability subgroup recognize that the role of business is to create and distribute wealth equitably, both within and across generations. They subscribe to the principles of sustainable development, which is development that ‘meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’. A core assumption of researchers in this group is that the broader social and environmental contexts matter to business and that sustainability is core to effective management of risks and opportunities in today’s world. Researchers in this group are also interested in research with the potential to address broad global challenges and to make the world a better place.

The Sustainability group therefore looks to push the boundaries of current theories and methods. We are excited by new ideas and new approaches, as current theories have not adequately addressed some of the significant macro challenges confronting us. We are also excited by research that has practical implications and engages with real-world problems and phenomena.

The faculty members comprising this group include Diane-Laure Arjaliès, Pratima (Tima) Bansal, Oana Branzei, Jury Gualandris, Rob Klassen, Deishin Lee, and Wren Montgomery. They have published cutting-edge sustainability research in top journals across disciplines, including Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Journal of Business Venturing, Journal of Operations Management, Management Accounting Research, Management Science, Organization Science, and Strategic Management Journal. PhD students in the Sustainability area have also received several awards including the Governor General’s Gold Medal (Mark DesJardine, Natalie Slawinski), conference best paper prizes, and have placed at top schools (McGill, Penn State etc.).

Ivey’s sustainability community is large and active, providing a thriving environment for our Sustainability PhD students. Approximately one third of faculty members across Ivey engage in sustainability research, reflecting its true cross-disciplinary nature (e.g. Janice Byrne, Nadine de Gannes, Alison Konrad, Kirk Kristofferson, Nouri Najjar and Brandon Schaufele, among others). As well, Ivey’s Sustainability group attracts a large number of high-quality doctoral students, post-doctoral students, and international faculty and student visitors. This rich support at Ivey across disciplines and methodological perspectives means the sustainability community at Ivey is vibrant, active and highly generative. Importantly, this structure also offers students the unique opportunity to explore sustainability questions and challenges that cross traditional academic boundaries and ways of seeing the world.

Ivey has gained an international reputation for its sustainability activities. We host the Sustainability PhD Academy that brings together 15 students and 5 faculty from around the world annually in this highly competitive program. Ivey’s annual Sustainability Conference also brings top global sustainability thinkers to Ivey for 2 days of deep conversation with Ivey PhD students and faculty, and aims to build a local community of sustainability scholars that crosses university boundaries. Sustainability doctoral students are also able to access conference and research funding through Ivey’s well recognized Centre for Building Sustainable Value. In addition, the Network for Business Sustainability (NBS) was founded at Ivey. NBS aims to bridge research and practice in order to advance business sustainability. Over 7500 managers and researchers subscribe to NBS’s newsletter.

*Please note that Sustainability is a stream under General Management

Areas of Research Focus

  • Time, space, and scale
  • Systems thinking/theory
  • Social and environmental entrepreneurship
  • Collective and cross-sectoral action for sustainability
  • Sustainable and conservation finance
  • Impact assessment and integrated reporting
  • Circular economy
  • Sustainable food supply chains
  • Co-evolutionary embedded systems (circular products, business models and supply chains)

 

PhD Student Opportunities

Thank you for your interest in our PhD program. The Sustainability group at Ivey is always happy to hear from superb students who are passionate about researching environmental and social sustainability issues. If you are interested in working with one of our faculty members, and have familiarized yourself with their specific research interests, it may be possible for you to find a fit and apply through their other area home (Accounting, Business Economics & Public Policy, Entrepreneurship, Operations Management, Strategy). This will still allow you to engage closely with our Sustainability faculty, students, reading group, and programming. Please feel free to contact Dr. Wren Montgomery with any questions.

Thank you for your interest in Sustainability at Ivey and we wish you the best of luck in your academic adventures!

Professor Wren Montgomery is interested in recruiting a PhD Student with interests at the intersection of social justice and environmental sustainability.  This position is open to various theoretical and methodological approaches and contexts. Training in inequality, justice, environmental justice, human rights, and environmental sustainability will be an asset. Interest in conflicts between corporations, government, and land and water defenders over resources, as well as interest in resource access and affordability are possible directions of this PhD opportunity. Please reach out to Dr. Montgomery with further questions. Sample papers:

  • Montgomery, A. W.; Dacin, M. T., (2021), “Burning Down the House: COVID-19 and Institutions”, Journal of Management Studies, July 58(5): 1426 – 1430.
  • Montgomery, A. W.; Dacin, M. T., 2020, “Water Wars in Detroit: Custodianship and the Work of Institutional Renewal”, Academy of Management Journal, October 63(5): 1455 – 1484

Program Requirements

All the below requirements are to be completed before the comprehensive exam in year 2. 

  • Statistics boot camp (offered mid-August before the start of Year 1)
  • Bus 9702 Multivariate Analysis in Year 1
  • Bus 9704 Research Methods in Year 1
  • Bus 9712 Special Topics in Statistics before the end of Year 21 
  • Bus 9723 Summer Research Paper before the end of Year 22 
  • Pass at least two PhD-level courses outside of Ivey before the end of Year 23 
  • Shadow and Ivey professor for an entire graduate, MBA or MSc course or complete at least 20 hours of courses/workshops at Western Teaching Centre

Discipline Requirements

Below are the discipline requirements governed by each of the respective disciplines. Please note that if further development is identified in any area, students may be required to take additional courses as requested by the student’s supervisor or the faculty discipline coordinator.

 General Management

Applies to students in the areas of Business, Economics and Public Policy, Entrepreneurship, International Business, Strategy or Sustainability

All these requirements are to be completed before the comprehensive exam unless otherwise noted.

  • Bus 9770 Business Strategy I
  • Bus 9771 Business Strategy II
  • Bus 9826 Organizational Theory
  • Two of the following GM field courses (1 unit total):
    • Bus 9703 International Management (0.5 units)
    • Bus 9774 Sustainability (0.25 units) and Bus 9776 Grand Challenges (0.25 units)
    • Bus 9775 Stakeholder Engagement (0.5 units)
    • Bus 9777 Entrepreneurship (0.5 units)
  • Elective Courses (2 units)
  • Research Paper and Oral Exam (To be completed by August 31 of Year 2)

 Information Systems

Two of these requirements are to be completed before the comprehensive exam

  • Bus 9832 Information Systems I
  • Bus 9842 Information Systems II
  • Bus 9852 Information Systems III

 Management Science

All these requirements are to be completed before the comprehensive exam

  • Bus 9802 Fundamentals of Management Science Research
  • Bus 9812 Management Science I
  • Bus 9872 Management Science II
  • Bus 9882 Management Science III
  • Bus 9078 Art of Modeling (MSc) 
  • Bus 9043 Big Data Analytics (MSc)
  • Bus 9044 Simulation and Risk Analysis (MSc)
  • Bus 9057 Prescriptive Analytics (MSc)
  • Econ 9601 Microeconomics I
  • Econ 9602 Microeconomics II
  • Econ 9607 Economic Mathematics I

 Marketing

All these requirements are to be completed before the comprehensive exam

  • Bus 9804 Theories of Marketing (0.5 unit)
  • Bus 9814 Decision-Making (0.5 unit)
  • Bus 9824 Experimental Design (0.5 unit)
  • Bus 9834 Consumer Behaviour (0.5 unit)

 Operations

All these requirements are to be completed before the comprehensive exam

  • Bus 9805 Operations I
  • Bus 9815 Operations II

 Organizational Behaviour

All these requirements are to be completed before the comprehensive exam

  • Bus 9806 Individual & the Organization
  • Bus 9816 Group Behaviour & Cross-Level Research
  • Bus 9826 Organizational Theory

If further development is identified in any area, students may be required to take additional courses as requested by the student’s supervisor or the discipline coordinator.

Program Milestones

  • Comprehensive Exam
  • Thesis Proposal Exam
  • Thesis Defense
NEW PHD THESIS ON “SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MODELS FOR ADVANCING SYSTEM-LEVEL  SUSTAINABILITY” | Sustainable Business Model.org

University Of Waterloo PhD In Sustainability Management

The PhD in Sustainability Management prepares students for career paths both inside and outside academia, including employment in government, business and third sector organizations. PhD professional development seminars allow students to gain skills suitable to knowledge mobilization and careers outside of academia.

Graduates prepare for career paths both inside and outside academia, including employment in government, business and third sector organizations. Through professional development seminars, students gain skills to mobilize their knowledge and develop skills for careers outside of academia.

This program normally takes 4 years to complete full-time.

Generous funding packages are provided for full-time students, including both eligible domestic and international doctoral candidates.

We encourage you to learn about research at SEED and connect with potential research supervisors in the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development.

Sustainability Management – PhD at Waterloo

At a glance:

Application deadline

  • February 1 (for admission in September)

Study options

  • Thesis

Minimum admission requirements

  • A Master’s degree with distinction (typically an overall average of at least 80%, or equivalent).
  • Facility with research methods is expected, whether through the presentation of specific graduate courses or original research at the graduate level.
  • Three academic references 
  • Proof of English language proficiency, if applicable. TOEFL 100 (writing 26, speaking 26), IELTS 7.5 (writing 7.0, speaking 7.0)

Approximate tuition, fees, and living costs

  • Canadian and permanent resident students, full-time: $2,254.00 tuition and $491.01 incidental fees per term (as of January 2021)
  • International students, full-time: $7,182.00 tuition and $703.01 incidental fees per term (as of January 2021)
  • Study and living costs

Our school offers exciting and challenging graduate programs leading to master’s and PhD degrees. A broad range of courses covers a spectrum of topics in sustainable development, environment, management and innovation. Students are welcome to take elective courses from other graduate programs in SEED and in other departments in the University.

Two types of graduate programs are available:

  • research degrees require four courses, original student research supervised by a professor, and culminate with the defense of a research thesis
  • professional degrees are course-based and include an applied project, internship or field placemen

Incoming graduate students are encouraged to visit the Waterloo Grad Ready website to learn more about the University and what to expect as a new student in graduate studies.

Here’s what our graduates have to say about MES in SUSM:

“Working hand-in-hand with your thesis advisor students of this program will begin the long journey of developing a masterful understanding of a specific sustainable issue and what innovative solutions there are to address them.”

– Reuben DeBoer, 2015

“The SUSM program is a great interdisciplinary platform to launch oneself into the world of business, policy-making and advanced higher research.”

– Anastasia Veeramani, 2015

“The staff were consistently supportive and always approachable. The program is diverse with an international lens, which helped to expand my horizons both in and out of the classroom.”

– Xiaoling Wang, 2014

Collaborative Water Program

Co-ordinated and supported by the Water Institute, the Collaborative Water Program promotes the development of interdisciplinary perspectives. The MES in Sustainability Management – Water is a unique program that allows students to complete their specialist training in SEED while working with peers from a variety of departments/schools and faculties. Students study complex water problems and learn how to work in interdisciplinary teams to better understand and address water issues. Graduates are future water leaders who are able to communicate across disciplines and within interdisciplinary teams in the water sector.

The program information below is valid for the winter 2022 term (January 1, 2022 – April 30, 2022).

The Graduate Studies Academic Calendar is updated 3 times per year, at the start of each academic term (January 1, May 1, September 1). Graduate Studies Academic Calendars from previous terms can be found in the archives.

Students are responsible for reviewing the general information and regulations section of the Graduate Studies Academic Calendar.

  • Program information
  • Admission requirements
  • Degree requirements

Program information

  • Admit term(s) 
    • Fall
  • Delivery mode 
    • On-campus
  • Program type 
    • Doctoral
    • Research
  • Registration option(s) 
    • Full-time
    • Part-time
  • Study option(s) 
    • Thesis

Admission requirements

  • Minimum requirements 
    • A Master’s degree with distinction (typically an overall average of at least 80%, or equivalent).
    • Facility with research methods is expected, whether through the presentation of specific graduate courses or original research at the graduate level.
  • Application materials 
    • Résumé
    • Supplementary information form
    • Transcript(s)
  • References 
    • Number of references:  3
    • Type of references:  academic references are required unless a professional reference is specified.
  • English language proficiency (ELP) (if applicable)

Degree requirements

  • Graduate Academic Integrity Module (Graduate AIM)
  • Courses 
    • Students must complete the following courses:
      • SUSM 701 Advanced theories
      • SUSM 702 Research design and methods
      • 2 elective courses
    • Students may request permission from the SEED Graduate Advisor to enrol in elective courses in other graduate programs that will complement their program of study.
  • Link(s) to courses
  • Sustainability Management (SUSM) courses
  • Graduate course search
  • PhD Professional Development Seminar I and PhD Professional Development Seminar II
  • The PhD in Sustainability Management prepares students for career paths both inside and outside academia, including employment in government, business and third sector organizations. PhD professional development seminars allow students to gain skills suitable to knowledge mobilization and careers outside of academia.
  • Students are required to complete two professional development seminars. Normally seminars should be completed before the PhD comprehensive examination.
  • PhD Comprehensive Examination
  • Students are required to meet the University-level PhD Comprehensive Examination minimum requirements outlined in the “Minimum requirements for the PhD degree” section of the Graduate Studies Academic Calendar (GSAC).
  • Further details are available from the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development (SEED) website.
  • PhD Thesis Proposal
  • Students present the research proposal to their doctoral advisory committee that has been set up, consisting of the supervisor, two committee members from the school, and one internal-external member who is not appointed or cross-appointed as SEED faculty. The research proposal consists of a written and an oral part. The milestone will be completed shortly (within a term) after the comprehensive examination. Students send the proposal in a written form to the committee members, gets their feedback and integrates the feedback into the proposal. The research proposal is accepted if all committee members agree to accept it. The decision will be communicated to the school’s graduate officer. The approved proposal is binding to both the student and the advisory committee.
  • PhD Thesis
  • The thesis should address original research and can be written either in form of a monograph or as a paper-based thesis. The thesis has to be presented in a public defense in front of a doctoral defence committee consisting of the members of the student’s doctoral advisory examination committee and an external member who is not a faculty member of the University of Waterloo and who has not been involved in the candidate’s research. After the presentation the committee asks questions about and provides comments to the thesis and the presentation.

sustainability management university of toronto

The Master of Science in Sustainability Management (MScSM) program provides the training for graduates to act outside the traditional disciplinary black boxes; integrate knowledge from management, social, and natural sciences to address sustainability issues; and make leading contributions and lasting advances in sustainability management.

The program is unique among science and management graduate programs by providing a strong foundation in sustainability management while offering an opportunity to specialize in a management or science concentration.

The program is designed for students from diverse backgrounds such as management science, social science, natural science, and engineering. The program was developed in consultation with leaders and future employers in business, non-profit, research, and government organizations.

The MScSM degree is for individuals who want to pursue management careers in sustainability-related divisions and organizations.

Students may also be interested in combined degree programs:

  • Environmental Management (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts / Sustainability Management, Master of Science (HBA/MScSM)
  • Environmental Management (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts / Sustainability Management, Master of Science (HBA/MScSM)
  • Environmental Science (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science / Sustainability Management, Master of Science (HBSc/MScSM)
  • Environmental Science (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science / Sustainability Management, Master of Science (HBSc/MScSM)

Quick Facts

DomesticInternational
Application payment deadlineMScSM:15-Mar-2022
Fall 2022 entry
MScSM:15-Mar-2022
Fall 2022 entry
Supporting documents deadlineMScSM:15-Mar-2022MScSM:15-Mar-2022
Minimum admission averageMScSM:mid-B (3.0/4.0)MScSM:mid-B (3.0/4.0)
Is a supervisor identified before or after admission?MScSM:AfterMScSM:After
If a supervisor is identified after admission (as per question above), is admission conditional upon securing a supervisor?MScSM:NoMScSM:No
Is a supervisor assigned by the graduate unit or secured by the applicant?MScSM:ApplicantMScSM:Applicant
Program length (full-time only)MScSM:5 sessions

Master of Science in Sustainability Management

Program Description

The Master of Science in Sustainability Management (MScSM) is an interdisciplinary, course-based professional program. The program provides education that integrates knowledge from management, social, and natural sciences to address sustainability issues. The MScSM provides a strong foundation in sustainability management while offering an opportunity to specialize in a management or science concentration. The program is designed for students from diverse educational backgrounds such as management, social science, natural science, and engineering. The program was developed in consultation with leaders and prospective employers in business, non-profit, research, and government organizations.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Institute for Management and Innovation’s additional admission requirements stated below.
  • An appropriate undergraduate degree from a recognized university in any area of natural science, social science, management, and engineering or any management, environment, or natural resource-driven background with a standing equivalent to at least a mid-B in the final year of the program.
  • Successful completion of an undergraduate statistics or mathematics course (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE] or equivalent).
  • Resumé/curriculum vitae (CV).
  • Letter of intent outlining the applicant’s interest in sustainability issues (750 words).

Program Requirements

Management Concentration
  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 9.0 FCEs as follows:
    • 6.5 FCEs (11 required courses) including:
      • SSM1090H Capstone Course and
      • SSM1100Y Research Paper I or SSM1101Y Research Paper II
    • 2.5 FCEs (5 elective courses) selected by chosen concentration as follows:
      • 2.0 FCEs from the Management elective courses
      • 0.5 FCE from the Science elective courses.
  • Internship. A summer internship placement (two to four months).
Science Concentration
  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 9.0 FCEs as follows:
    • 6.5 FCEs (11 required courses) including:
      • SSM1090H Capstone Course and
      • SSM1100Y Research Paper I or SSM1101Y Research Paper II
    • 2.5 FCEs (5 elective courses) selected by chosen concentration as follows:
      • 2.0 FCEs from the Science elective courses
      • 0.5 FCE from the Management elective courses.
  • Internship. A summer internship placement (two to four months).
Program Path
Year 1: Fall
SSM1010YPrinciples of Sustainability Management
SSM1020HDecision Making for Sustainability Management
SSM1050HEcosystem Science
SSM1060HManaging Sustainable Organizations
Year 1: Winter
SSM1030HEnvironmental Science
SSM1040HManagerial Economics for Sustainability Management
SSM1070HSustainability Law and Policy
SSM1080HStrategies for Sustainability Management
SSM1120HSocial Dimensions of Sustainability
Year 1: Summer
SSM1110HSustainability Management Internship
Year 2: Fall
SSM1100Y or
SSM1101Y
Research Paper I or
Research Paper II
Plus 1.5 FCE elective
Year 2: Winter
SSM1090HCapstone Course — Sustainable Enterprise
SSM1100Y or
SSM1101Y
Research Paper I or
Research Paper II
Plus 1.0 FCE elective

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Master of Science in Sustainability Management Program Co-op Program -  Experiential Learning Hub

sustainability management university of waterloo

The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) in Sustainability Management (SUSM) is a graduate research degree with six courses and a thesis.

The program provides future sustainability innovators with interdisciplinary research skills, management approaches, strategies and processes to realize sustainable outcomes within business, government and third sector organizations.

Our graduates work as:

  • Consultant, Anthesis Group
  • Program Manager, Mennonite Economic Development Associates
  • Junior Analyst, Sustainalytics
  • Climate Change Coordinator, The Town of Lincoln
  • Co-Founder, NU Grocery
  • Corporate Responsibility Analyst, Groupe AGÉCO

Here’s what our graduates have to say about MES in SUSM:

“The SUSM program is a great interdisciplinary platform to launch oneself into the world of business, policy-making and advanced higher research.”

– Anastasia Veeramani, 2015

“There are three things that fascinate me about the SUSM program: the interdisciplinary approach to research, the diversity of my class, and focus on industry practices. If you are looking for a program that perfectly integrates sustainability concepts into research and business, this is the program for you!”

-Tobi Oyewole, 2021

“The staff were consistently supportive and always approachable. The program is diverse with an international lens, which helped to expand my horizons both in and out of the classroom.”

– Xiaoling Wang, 2014

Where do our graduates go?

Results from our 2021 alumni review reveal that SUSM Masters alumni are prolific creators of academia and management. (Based on data from 77% of Alumni)

  • 19% of our SUSM master students have gone on to doctoral studies

Of those out of School

  • 62% are employed with the private sector including corporations, consulting companies, private firms
  • 8% have entered professorial or teaching positions
  • 15% work in public service including Federal or Provincial government, municipalities, First Nations, public agencies, and international multilateral organizations
  • 15% have jobs in the third sector including NGOs, development organizations
  • 4 alumni founded their own companies

Collaborative Water Program

Co-ordinated and supported by the Water Institute, the Collaborative Water Program promotes the development of interdisciplinary perspectives. The MES in Sustainability Management – Water is a unique program that allows students to complete their specialist training in SEED while working with peers from a variety of departments/schools and faculties. Students study complex water problems and learn how to work in interdisciplinary teams to better understand and address water issues. Graduates are future water leaders who are able to communicate across disciplines and within interdisciplinary teams in the water sector.

Minimum admission requirements

  • A four-year undergraduate degree equivalent in a humanities, social science, health, engineering, natural science, environmental science, or business discipline with an overall average of at least 75% in the last two years.
  • Two academic references 
  • Proof of English language proficiency, if applicable. TOEFL 100 (writing 26, speaking 26), IELTS 7.5 (writing 7.0, speaking 7.0)

Approximate tuition, fees, and living costs

  • To determine the tuition and incidental fees per term for your program, visit the Graduate program tuition page on the Finance website. Once you are on the page:
    • Choose your program type: master’s & diploma programs or doctoral programs
    • Choose your residency status: Canadian/permanent resident or international
    • Choose a term (tuition amounts for future terms are posted approximately two months prior to the start of each term and incidental fees are subject to change)
    • Find your program under the appropriate faculty. Tuition amounts are listed per term, with three terms occurring over the course of a year.
MES in Sustainability Management | School of Environment, Enterprise and  Development | University of Waterloo

phd in sustainable development uk

MPhil/PhD in Global Sustainable Development (2022 Entry)

Our MPhil/PhD in Global Sustainable Development (GSD) offers you the opportunity to cross disciplinary boundaries to address complex challenges of global sustainable development. Working with experts from Warwick’s GSD Department and the Institute for Global Sustainable Development (IGSD), you will deliver impactful, lasting sustainable development research.

Course overview

There is a global need for researchers who are skilled in challenge-led, transdisciplinary methods to help close knowledge gaps around research and practice related to the sustainability of human-environment interactions.

Our Global Sustainable Development MPhil/PhD is for those driven to develop innovative approaches to complex challenges of sustainable development. With the support of a supervisory team, you will work on a transdisciplinary project addressing a sustainability challenge.

Through structured training, you will be equipped to integrate methods and perspectives from different academic and practice fields to address current and future sustainable development challenges. In the first year, you will have the opportunity to undertake a core module and establish a personal development plan in collaboration with your supervisors.

Throughout the programme, you will have the opportunity to gain methods training designed to broaden your research approach. Collectively, this training will prepare you to co-produce transformative, transdisciplinary research projects.

We are excited to welcome students with diverse backgrounds and skills to this programme.

Teaching and learning

Students on this course will be trained to have competence in a subject area that spans at least two disciplinary perspectives. You will be trained in transdisciplinary methods, enabling you to draw on skills from multiple disciplines to work effectively and equitably with non-academic partners.

In the first year you will normally be required to study one core module, ‘Global Challenges and Transdisciplinary Responses’ (20 CATS), equipping you with the core skills and knowledge of key principles of transdisciplinary research on sustainable development.

You will also agree a tailored personal development programme with your supervisors for your first year of training. For instance, your development programme may include taking other postgraduate modules from across the University to develop specific skills required for your research.

You may also decide to take researcher development training courses and workshops facilitated by the University’s Doctoral College as part of your development programme.

Research environment

You will join a community of postgraduate students and early career researchers in global sustainable development. IGSD is Warwick’s hub for transdisciplinary research on global sustainable development, committed to tackling global challenges and enabling transformative change of human-environment interactions.

Throughout your degree you will be encouraged to engage actively in research activities by forming reading groups, participating in workshops and guest lectures, and taking part in IGSD’s annual conference.

You will have opportunities to engage with research across the University, including research led by Warwick’s Global Research Priorities and other cross-cutting research centres across the University, such as the Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies (CIM), the Warwick Institute for the Science of Cities (WISC), the Warwick Interdisciplinary Research Centre for International Development (WICID), and the Centre for Digital Inquiry (CDI).

General entry requirements

Minimum requirements

2:i undergraduate degree and a Master’s (or equivalent) in a related subject.

English language requirements

You can find out more about our English language requirements. This course requires the following:

  • Band B
  • IELTS overall score of 7.0, minimum component scores of two at 6.0/6.5 and the rest at 7.0 or above.

International qualifications

We welcome applications from students with other internationally recognised qualifications.

For more information, please visit the international entry requirements page.

Additional requirements

There are no additional requirements for this course.

DPhil in Sustainable Urban Development

Oxford University

The Doctor of Philosophy (DPhil) in Sustainable Urban Development is a part-time doctoral programme that provides outstanding students an opportunity to pursue in-depth and rigorous research about the pressing challenges of urban sustainability and the processes of environmental, economic, and social development in urban environments around the world. 

Students admitted to the programme are usually motivated to undertake detailed research in preparation for an academic career and other research-intensive occupations; to have a substantial impact on future policy-making processes; or to pursue and/or advance their professional career at organisations and institutions operating in the field of sustainable urban development. The course provides support and an intellectual environment by leading scholars in the field to pursue your own independent research.

Pattern of teaching and learning

This is a part-time DPhil programme, taken over a minimum of four years and a maximum of eight years.

You are required to have a good general knowledge of the field within which research falls and of the methods appropriate to the study of this field. Throughout the period of study, you will be part of a thriving international graduate community of students engaged with sustainable urban development, including students on the part-time MSc in Sustainable Urban Development.

Supervision

The allocation of graduate supervision for this course is the responsibility of the Department for Continuing Education and it is not always possible to accommodate the preferences of incoming graduate students to work with a particular member of staff. Under exceptional circumstances a supervisor may be found outside the Department for Continuing Education.

Students admitted to this degree will conduct their own research under the guidance of a University supervisor, who will advise on all aspects of training, development and academic progress. In being admitted to the degree you must be prepared to work independently a good deal, and you will need considerable personal motivation.

In the case of students admitted to the DPhil who require specific help to adjust to an academic programme or to a new range of skills, the supervisor will work with them to ensure that they have additional support.

Students on the DPhil are required to attend a minimum of 30 days of university-based work each year for the duration of your studies, usually that involves meeting their supervisor once a term.

Assessment

You will be admitted initially as a Probationary Research Student (PRS), in line with University regulations on doctorates. During the probationary period, you will develop and begin work on the thesis topic. You will develop research skills through a range of training and skills development primarily offered via the Department for Continuing Education Graduate School, as well as across the University.

Students must apply for a Transfer of Status from PRS to DPhil status between the sixth and the eighth academic term after admission, each academic year at Oxford having three terms. This involves the submission of a piece of written work that is examined by two assessors, neither of whom will be your supervisors. This process is to ensure that your work is of potential DPhil quality and that the methodology of the research is appropriate and feasible. Upon successful completion of the Transfer of Status, you would usually undertake a period of primary fieldwork/data collection over one to two years.

You will also be required to apply for a Confirmation of Status as DPhil sometime between the twelfth and eighteenth term after admission. This will also involve the submission of a piece of written work that is assessed by two assessors, neither of whom will be your supervisors. The Confirmation of Status assessment is different to the Transfer of Status assessment as the assessors will be focusing on how the research is progressing, the quality of the draft chapters/papers, and on the plan for completion. The assessors will be looking to ensure that you are making the appropriate amount of progress in the development of your thesis, so that thesis submission will be achieved within the time limit.

You will be expected to submit a substantive academic thesis of around 100,000 words after the eighteenth or, at most, twenty-fourth term from the date of admission. To be successfully awarded a DPhil in Sustainable Urban Development you will need to defend your thesis orally (viva voce) in front of two appointed examiners.

Graduate destinations

It is expected that students will already be in employment, working within some area related to urban development. The DPhil may enhance professional practice, career prospects and help secure promotions and other opportunities.

Changes to this course and your supervision

The University will seek to deliver this course in accordance with the description set out in this course page. However, there may be situations in which it is desirable or necessary for the University to make changes in course provision, either before or after registration. The safety of students, staff and visitors is paramount and major changes to delivery or services may have to be made in circumstances of a pandemic (including Covid-19), epidemic or local health emergency. In addition, in certain circumstances, for example due to visa difficulties or because the health needs of students cannot be met, it may be necessary to make adjustments to course requirements for international study.

Where possible your academic supervisor will not change for the duration of your course. However, it may be necessary to assign a new academic supervisor during the course of study or before registration for reasons which might include illness, sabbatical leave, parental leave or change in employment.

For further information please see our page on changes to courses and the provisions of the student contract regarding changes to courses.

Other courses you may wish to consider

If you’re thinking about applying for this course, you may also wish to consider the courses listed below. These courses may have been suggested due to their similarity with this course, or because they are offered by the same department or faculty.

Courses suggested by the department

Sustainable Urban Development MSc

All graduate courses in the social sciences offered by this department

Applied Landscape Archaeology MSc

Archaeology DPhil

Diplomatic Studies MSt

Diplomatic Studies PGDip

Sustainable Urban Development MSc

Sustainable Urban Development DPhil

Sustainability

University of Surrey

The University of Surrey is a global community of ideas and people, dedicated to life-changing education and research. An international outlook is at the heart of the University’s mission to solve global challenges, lead research and innovation.

The Sustainability programme at the University of Surrey allows you to pursue research studies at doctoral level while gaining invaluable research experience in a prestigious organisation external to the University, enabling you to apply your knowledge to real-life sustainability issues.

Environment and Sustainability PhD research course | University of Surrey

phd sustainable development columbia university

The sustainability of development presents some of the most important policy challenges concerning the future of our planet, and it requires an interdisciplinary approach involving the social, natural, engineering, and health sciences. The PhD in Sustainable Development includes a set of rigorous core requirements in the social and natural sciences designed to provide a deep understanding of the interaction between natural and social systems, and provides students with the flexibility to pursue in-depth research in a broad variety of critical policy areas. No other doctoral program produces graduates with the unique combination of diverse skills and deep insight into the most challenging problems of future human welfare. Together with experts and faculty at Columbia, you’ll conduct research in a wide variety of areas, including climate change and its social consequences, causes and solutions to extreme poverty, energy systems, agricultural transitions, water resources, and more.Who It’s For

The PhD program in Sustainable Development is for those looking to pursue rigorous scholarship and research at the boundary between social and natural sciences. Students should have an interest in pursuing academic careers in interdisciplinary graduate and undergraduate programs with a focus on policy and the environment as well as in the more traditional social science disciplines. This degree is also ideal for students interested in a variety of non-academic career paths, including leadership roles in government ministries throughout the world, creating environmental and sustainable development policy for NGOs, in international institutions such as the IMF and the World Bank, or in private firms engaged in environmental and development projects.Career Paths

Students have their choice of academic positions as tenure-track professors or post-doctoral fellows, as well as high-level positions in non-academic fields, such as the private or NGO sector, government, or finance, for example.

CURRICULUM

Students in the first two years of the program generally take a total of 60 credits in the areas of sustainable development, economics, qualitative analysis, natural sciences, and social science. This is followed by the planning and execution of research. In the third and fourth years, students may take electives as needed for ongoing research and preparation for the oral exam. The fifth year is highlighted by the dissertation defense.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Admission to the PhD program is processed by the Graduate School of Arts and Science (GSAS); please refer to their website for basic admission requirements.

The PhD program requires the following:

  • Strong background in social science, including four courses in college-level social science with a minimum of two economics courses
  • Quantitative skills, including at least two courses in college-level calculus through multivariate calculus (Calculus III in the US) and at least one college-level course in linear algebra
  • Three or more college-level courses in natural science or engineering

TUITION & FEES

Full-tuition fellowships with stipends are available for all admitted students who are not already sponsored by their governments, employers, or a foundation.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Students must complete the following as part of this program.

  • At least 60 overall credits
  • Completion of an MA thesis
  • Completion of a dissertation prospectus and oral examination for the MPhil
  • Six semesters of teaching or research fellowships assignments
  • Defense of dissertation

PHD DISSERTATION

The PhD dissertation will be on a social science topic in sustainable development. The social science research will be informed by an understanding of physical and natural science constraints and opportunities influencing economic development.

Students with a regional area of interest to their dissertation may wish to do research abroad, so as to conduct field studies, use archives, improve language skills, or confer with local experts. In order that students may complete the PhD program without delay, it is preferred that they make use of summers to conduct such research. Students who feel they require a longer period of field research or language training need the approval of their advisor, and of the DGS. Students may not receive extended residence credit for study or research away from Columbia before the completion of all course work requirements and comprehensive examinations.

PhD Defense

  1. Complete the GSAS deposit application and pay the $85 processing fee;
  2. Submit the required Survey of Earned Doctorates online;
  3. Upload and submit a PDF copy of your dissertation;
  4. Obtain a signed Approval Card that certifies you have made all required revisions and that the dissertation has been approved for deposit by your sponsor and by your doctoral program.

Open defenses (optional)
If both the candidate for a defense and the Advisory Committee choose to have an “open” defense, the following will apply:

  1. The candidate will have a maximum of 40 minutes to present major conclusions of the thesis research, with at least half of the time devoted to a description of new findings or insights in the field discussed that directly resulted from research by the student.
  2.  Any member of the University community or other interested parties can attend the first part of the thesis defense.
  3. Questions following the initial presentation are permitted for a maximum of 10 minutes.
  4. Following the oral presentation by the candidate and the brief period for general questions, the defense committee will question the candidate in closed session for a period of up to 90 minutes.

If either the candidate or the Advisory Committee prefer, the procedures for “closed defense” (i.e., 20-minute oral presentation followed by questions from the defense committee in closed session for a period of up to 90 minutes) will be followed.

  1. Candidates must consult with their advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies about scheduling the defense. Every Ph.D. student must submit the Intent to Distribute and Defend form directly to GSAS.
  2. The final examination will not be scheduled until the Director of Graduate Studies has recommended the dissertation for defense. A five-person examining committee will be appointed by the department and must be approved by GSAS. The DGS will then officially invite the examiners.
  3. The Application for Defense must be completed by the Candidate and the Director of Graduate Studies and submitted by the program’s office to the GSAS Dissertation office.
  4. Members of the PhD examining committee must be given a minimum of three weeks to read the thesis, so the defense may comfortably be scheduled after submission of the thesis to the Advisory Committee. Before being recommended for defense, the candidate must submit to his/her Advisory Committee draft copies of the thesis, including figures, plates and tables and obtain the Advisory Committee’s written approval of the draft. (Written approval by the Advisory Committee indicates only that the thesis as it stands or with revisions suggested by them is in good enough form to justify scheduling the defense.)
  5. After the Advisory Committee has given its preliminary approval in writing, and the candidate has made any revisions suggested by them, he/she must distribute copies of the dissertation to the external readers. Instructions for the correct form for preparing the manuscript and information on publication options may be obtained via the Graduate School’s website (http://www.columbia.edu/cu/gsas/)
  6. The candidate must see that outstanding fees or loans to the University are paid and make sure that he/she has fulfilled all other Departmental requirements. When these requirements have been fulfilled and the examining committee has been appointed by the DGS, the candidate is notified of the examination date, usually about two weeks in advance.
  7. After passing the final examination, the candidate must see to any minor revisions and their approval by the examining committee before final deposit. If major revisions were called for (a defense-vote of “incomplete”), these must be made and submitted within a stated period (usually no fewer than three months and no longer than one year from the date of the defense) to the supervising committee, whose approval will have to be certified in writing before the candidate can be recorded as having passed the final examination. From the time of the “pass” vote, the student has a maximum of six months to deposit the thesis. There are four steps to completing your deposit — the steps can be done in any order, but your deposit is only considered complete when all four steps are done.
  8. Doctorate degrees are awarded in October, February, and May. Check the academic calendar for specific deadlines for the final deposit of the dissertation. (You may, however, call yourself “Dr.” as of the day of your deposit, since that date will appear on your official transcript.)

Given that a large part of the program’s curriculum is dedicated to a unique set of required core courses, credit for previous work is very rarely granted. However, credit for previous graduate work done elsewhere, at a GPA of 3.5 or higher, may be granted on a case-by-case basis and at the discretion of the program directors after a student has been admitted to the program, and cannot exceed a total of 30 credits.

APPLICATION CHECKLIST

  • Official Transcripts
  • GRE Test Scores (should you have access issues due to Covid, please contact the Program Coordinator)
  • TOEFL Scores
  • CV
  • List of and grades received for economics, math and other quantitative coursework
  • Statement of Purpose
  • 3-4 Letters of Recommendation
  • Application Fee

PhD in Sustainable Development Courses

SDEV U6240 Environmental Science for Sustainable Development. 3.00 Points.

Category: EE, EPD:Sustainable

This course provides a rigorous survey of the key areas of natural science that are critical to understanding sustainable development. The course will provide the theories, methodological techniques and applications associated with each natural science unit presented. The teaching is designed to ensure that students have the natural science basis to properly appreciate the co-dependencies of natural and human systems, which are central to understanding sustainable development. Students will learn the complexities of the interaction between the natural and human environment. After completing the course, students should be able to incorporate scholarly scientific work into their research or policy decisions and be able to use scientific methods of data analysis. This is a modular course that will cover core thematic areas specifically, climate, natural hazards, water management, public health/epidemiology, and ecology/biodiversity. To achieve coherence across lectures this course will emphasize how each topic is critical to studies of sustainable development and place-based case studies in recitation will integrate various topics covered. In the lectures and particularly the recitation sections this course will emphasize key scientific concepts such as uncertainty, experimental versus observational approaches, prediction and predictability, the use of models and other essential methodological aspects

TermSectionCall NumberInstructorTimes/Location
Fall 202100116668John MutterT 11:00am – 12:50pm
404 International Affairs Bldg
Fall 2021R0116669T 4:10pm – 6:00pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

SDEV U9200 Sustainable Development I. 1.5 Point.

This course is restricted to PhD in Sustainable Development

TermSectionCall NumberInstructorTimes/Location
Fall 202100116672Douglas AlmondM 4:10pm – 6:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg
Fall 2021R0116673F 10:00am – 11:30am
823 International Affairs Bldg

SDEV U9201 Sustainable Development II. 1.5 Point.

This course is restricted to PhD in Sustainable Development

TermSectionCall NumberInstructorTimes/Location
Spring 202200110675John MutterM 4:10pm – 6:00pm
Room TBA
Spring 2022R0110676F 10:00am – 11:30am
Room TBA

SDEV U9240 Human Ecology & Sustainable Development. 3.00 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Sustainable, PhD in Sustainable Development
Open to PhD Students Only

This course has two primary objectives: first, to provide a structured way to think about—and conduct research in—the field of sustainable development. Second, to introduce formal models of dynamic, coupled human and environmental systems

TermSectionCall NumberInstructorTimes/Location
Spring 202200114919Jeffrey ShraderT 11:00am – 12:50pm
Room TBA
Spring 2022R0114920W 2:10pm – 4:00pm
Room TBA

SDEV U9245 Environment & Resource Economics. 3 Points.

The goal of this course is to introduce you to the basic concepts of natural resource and environmental economics in about 14 weeks. It should hence be seen as a survey class that introduces the basic ideas of the field. Prerequisites: Graduate level classes in micro-economics and econometrics as well as some knowledge of optimal control theory. Furthermore, you should know the basic commands in STATA and either MATLAB or R (for some of the problem sets, but they are easy to learn).

TermSectionCall NumberInstructorTimes/Location
Fall 202100116674Wolfram SchlenkerTh 2:10pm – 4:00pm
823 International Affairs Bldg

SDEV U9248 Collective Action for Global Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

Category: PhD in Sustainable Development
Registration restricted to PhD Students

When externalities go uncorrected, and public goods go undersupplied, the reason is not that “the market” fails; the reason is that governments are unable or unwilling to intervene effectively. The biggest problem is with transnational externalities and regional and global public goods. This is partly because of the scale of these problems, but it is also because the institutional arrangements at this level make effective intervention difficult. There is no World Government. Instead, there are around 200 sovereign states. To support sustainable development globally, states must cooperate, and yet states’ self-interests often conflict with their collective interests. This is why all countries agree that collective action must be taken to limit climate change, and yet, though they try and try again, countries seem unable to muster the individual action needed to meet their own collective goal. The aim of this course is to develop an apparatus for understanding international collective action for sustainable development. By an “apparatus,” I mean a theory, a structured way of looking at and understanding the world. Rather than just present the theory, my aim is to show you why theory is needed, how it has been constructed, and what its strengths and weaknesses are. Basically, in addition to teaching you principles and tools, I want you to come to see how this field has developed, what it has achieved, and where it has fallen short. Throughout the course, we shall also be looking at tests and applications of the theory-empirical and experimental papers in addition to case studies. The course draws from a number of disciplines, especially economics, game theory (analytical and experimental), and international relations-but also international law, philosophy, history, the natural and physical sciences, and engineering. The focus will be on institutions, and the way that they restructure the relations among states to cause states to behave differently-that is, to cause them to undertake collective action. In terms of applications, the course will address not only climate change but also depletion of the ozone layer, trans-boundary air pollution, pollution of the oceans, over-fishing, biodiversity loss, and the emergence and spread of infectious diseases.

TermSectionCall NumberInstructorTimes/Location
Fall 202100116675Scott BarrettW 2:10pm – 4:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

ECON GR6211 Microeconomic Analysis I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the director of graduate studies’ permission.
Corequisites: ECON G6410.

Consumer and producer behavior; general competitive  equilibrium, welfare and efficiency, behavior under uncertainty, intertemporal allocation and capital theory, imperfect competition, elements of game theory, problems of information, economies with price rigidities.

Fall 2021: ECON GR6211
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
ECON 6211001/10900T Th 2:40pm – 3:55pm
703 Hamilton Hall
Evan Sadler, Pierre-Andre Chiappori424/50

ECON GR6212 Microeconomic Analysis II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the director of graduate studies’ permission.
Corequisites: ECON G6410.

Consumer and producer behavior; general competitive  equilibrium, welfare and efficiency, behavior under uncertainty, intertemporal allocation and capital theory, imperfect competition, elements of game theory, problems of information, economies with price rigidities.

Spring 2022: ECON GR6212
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
ECON 6212001/15459M W 8:40am – 9:55am
Room TBA
Yeon-Koo Che, Elliot Lipnowski40/45

ECON GR6411 Introduction To Econometrics I. 4 points.

Corequisites: ECON G6410 and the director of graduate studies’ permission.

Introduction to probability theory and statistical inference.

Fall 2021: ECON GR6411
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
ECON 6411001/10928M W 1:10pm – 2:25pm
520 Mathematics Building
Simon Lee, José Montiel Olea423/45

ECON GR6412 Introduction To Econometrics II. 4 points.

Corequisites: ECON G6410 and the director of graduate studies’ permission.

Introduction to the general linear model and its use in econometrics, including the consequences of departures from the standard assumptions.

Spring 2022: ECON GR6412
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
ECON 6412001/14681T Th 8:40am – 9:55am
227 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Bernard Salanie, Serena Ng40/45

About the author

Study on Scholarship Today -- Check your eligibility for up to 100% scholarship.

Leave a Comment