Mathematical Methods For Physical Sciences

 This classic text, now in its seventh edition, is a completely revised and expanded account of the methods of mathematical physics, emphasizing those which are most widely applicable. Written by a famous authority who was widely recognized as the leading expositor of the field at the time of his death, Mathematical Methods for Physical Sciences will continue to appeal to anyone with an interest in basic physics.

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Mathematical Methods For Physical Sciences

Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences is a 1966 textbook by mathematician Mary L. Boas intended to develop skills in mathematical problem solving needed for junior to senior-graduate courses in engineering, physics, and chemistry. The book provides a comprehensive survey of analytic techniques and provides careful statements of important theorems while omitting most detailed proofs. Each section contains a large number of problems, with selected answers. Numerical computational approaches using computers are outside the scope of the book.

The book, now in its third edition, was still widely used in university classrooms as of 1999 and is frequently cited in other textbooks and scientific papers.

DESCRIPTION

Now in its third edition, Mathematical Concepts in the Physical Sciences, 3rd Edition provides a comprehensive introduction to the areas of mathematical physics. It combines all the essential math concepts into one compact, clearly written reference. This book is intended for students who have had a two-semester or three-semester introductory calculus course.  Its purpose is to help students develop, in a short time, a basic competence in each of the many areas of mathematics needed in advanced courses in physics, chemistry, and engineering.  Students are given sufficient depth to gain a solid foundation (this is not a recipe book).  At the same time, they are not overwhelmed with detailed proofs that are more appropriate for students of mathematics.  The emphasis is on mathematical methods rather than applications, but students are given some idea of how the methods will be used along with some simple applications.

About the Author

Mary Layne Boas (1917–2010) was an American mathematician and physics professor best known as the author of Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences (1966), an undergraduate textbook that was still widely used in college classrooms as of 1999.

Chapters

  1. Infinite series, power series
  2. Complex numbers
  3. Linear algebra
  4. Partial differentiation
  5. Multiple integrals
  6. Vector analysis
  7. Fourier series and transforms
  8. Ordinary differential equations
  9. Calculus of variations
  10. Tensor analysis
  11. Special functions
  12. Series solution of differential equations; Legendre, Bessel, Hermite, and Laguerre functions
  13. Partial differential equations
  14. Functions of a complex variable
  15. Integral transforms
  16. Probability and statistics

Top reviews

Anthony T. Lam, DMD5.0 out of 5 stars Concisely and well written mathematical physics textbook. Reviewed in the United States on September 28, 2019Verified PurchaseI used the 2nd edition back in the mid-90’s for my undergrad mathematical physics class. I didn’t really appreciate it at the time and only until I took Differential Equations and Linear Algebra in the math department. I found that I had already known 90% of the math content in those classes and mainly some of the proofs were new to me.

Mary Boas was a master of math methods and writing. There are no wasted words in her explanations. I only wish that she provided a bit more insight in some of the chapters.

Volvokid

5.0 out of 5 stars 

Very clarifying math physics textbook. Reviewed in the United States on August 21, 2019Verified PurchaseI now see why this book is so highly regarded. My university uses it as the textbook for Math Methods in Physics which is a required course of all physics majors. I haven’t gone all the way through it yet, but what I have worked through, I really like. I am a 4th year physics (2nd bachelors) student but before I started this physics degree I was not too math savvy. Good with numbers, yes but I didn’t even know what a derivative was until 3 years ago. I only bring all that up because after the past three years of physics undergrad math being quite challenging for me, this book does a great job of wrapping it all up in the context of physics and making it all finally click.

Robert Brunetto

5.0 out of 5 stars 

“Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences” as it fills the slot to the 1985 edition of Mathematics for Phyicists by Arfken. Reviewed in the United States on December 21, 2017Verified Purchase Mary L. Boas has passed away in 2010 and this is a must have book. I also have her first edition with a paper back dust jacket from 1967 or so. She improves what she has, and includes the definition of double factorial. It is her immense ability with the English language, that for me, leads to a new, shorter, clearer definition of the double factorial. One must also have the 1985 edition of “Mathematical Methods for Physicists” (uncertain of title accuracy) by just the author Arfken. He does have errors ; but they are easily picked up. The new stuff is also necessary, if you intend to become a physicist; however the 1985 edition far exceeds the new one. I do not know at this point if you can access it on Amazon.com.2 people found this helpful.

MC

5.0 out of 5 stars 

Perfect for science undergraduates Reviewed in the United States on April 16, 2019Verified PurchaseI can’t understand why anyone would rank this book less than 5 stars.

I am self studying physics in the hope of understanding particle physics one day. I have been through the standard calculus books, Strang’s Linear Algebra and a some of Saff’s Complex Analysis. Then I read Taylor’s excellent Classical Mechanics book and then started Griffith’s Electrodynamics. Griffith’s math is more complex and even though he does a good job of teaching the math needed, I find it difficult to learn the math and the physics at the same time. I first got Byron and Fuller’s book knowing that it might be advanced, but wanted to try anyway. It is way too advanced for my stage. I couldn’t understand any equations on any page I opened to. I passed on Boas first time around as so many people said it was light on proofs. After the Byron and Fuller debacle, I thought I would try this book.

IT IS FANTASTIC!!!

Jesse_01

5.0 out of 5 stars 

Brilliant book!Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 13, 2012Verified PurchaseI am a first year Physics undergraduate at Imperial College and this book covers all the major topics in a clear and concise way.
To see a full list of everything covered go to the ‘search inside this book’ link below its image.
The book starts each topic from the basics, so don’t worry about being thrown in at the deep end having forgotten stuff. But also don’t be put off thinking it wastes time on the basics, it doesn’t.
There are a lot of question and answers on all the topics as you go along so you can check your understanding, and worked examples too.
I would say it is best for physics and I would double check with the course teacher/lecturer for biology or chemistry as it is not cheap. For me, it was the perfect choice!

mathematical methods in the physical sciences boas

It is my great pleasure to announce the opening of my new blog, Mathematical Methods for Physical Sciences!

What are physical sciences, you ask? Simply put, they are any scientific disciplines that involve the study of inanimate natural objects. Physics and chemistry, for instance, would be two examples. My blog aims to explore interesting mathematical topics related to these fields and provide a space for readers to engage in discussion about them.

Essentially, this blog is intended to be a space where people who like math can learn more about how it applies to the physical world, and where people interested in physics or chemistry can go to get a better understanding of the math involved. We will also have guest posts from various experts in these fields, so stay tuned!

Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences is a 1966 textbook by mathematician Mary L. Boas intended to develop skills in mathematical problem solving needed for junior to senior-graduate courses in engineering, physics, and chemistry. The book provides a comprehensive survey of analytic techniques and provides careful statements of important theorems while omitting most detailed proofs. Each section contains a large number of problems, with selected answers. Numerical computational approaches using computers are outside the scope of the book.

The book, now in its third edition, was still widely used in university classrooms as of 1999[1] and is frequently cited in other textbooks and scientific papers.

Chapters

  1. Infinite series, power series
  2. Complex numbers
  3. Linear algebra
  4. Partial differentiation
  5. Multiple integrals
  6. Vector analysis
  7. Fourier series and transforms
  8. Ordinary differential equations
  9. Calculus of variations
  10. Tensor analysis
  11. Special functions
  12. Series solution of differential equations; Legendre, Bessel, Hermite, and Laguerre functions
  13. Partial differential equations
  14. Functions of a complex variable
  15. Integral transforms
  16. Probability and statistics
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