cyberpsychology bournemouth

Last Updated on January 17, 2023

Cyberpsychology is defined as the intersection of technology and behavior. Its focuses on the effect of technology on human behavior, and the effects of human behavior on technology. The main cyberpsychology areas of interest include online identity development, online relationships, social interactions in virtual worlds, cybersickness and cyberslacking.

Right here on Collegelearners, you are privy to a litany of relevant information on psychology low entry requirements, cyberpsychology undergraduate,how to become a cyber psychologist , and so much more. Take out time to visit our catalog for more information on similar topics.

Psychology - Psychology

cyberpsychology bournemouth

Why study BSc (Hons) Cyberpsychology at BU?

  • Develop a well-rounded knowledge of all areas of psychology. 
  • Learn a range of research skills and methods to investigate traditional and online behaviour and apply that knowledge in a variety of contexts – including your own independent research. 
  • Use state-of-the art facilities such as eye tracking technology to help you understand how people, groups, organisations and societies interact with, and make use of, technology. 
  • Work with world-leading researchers on projects through the Research Apprenticeship Scheme – many of our students have published work with members of staff.  
  • Opportunity to take an optional 4-week or 30-week placement in industry to give you essential real-world experience and begin building a network of professional contacts.
  • Our Psychology courses received an impressive 89% satisfaction rating.

Course details

On this course you will be taught by a range of staff with relevant expertise and knowledge appropriate to the content of the unit. This will include senior academic staff, qualified professional practitioners, demonstrators, technicians and research students.

How you will be assessed

You will be assessed by coursework culminating in your final year research project, and you will also undertake group work and written exams. The assessment methods for each unit can be found on the programme profile in the programme specification for your course.

Foundation year

Core units

  • Academic Study Skills: You will gain the fundamental academic and research skills required for degree level study. The unit will introduce you to a broad grounding in literature searching, literature review, data collection, methodological approach, data analysis and interpretation and ethical practice. It will also support you to begin to develop a critical and analytical approach to your work and identify areas for personal development. 
  • Applied Sciences: You’ll gain a basic understanding of some fundamental aspects of science underpinning more specific disciplines, and an appreciation of how various scientific disciplines impact human life. You’ll understand the differences between pure and applied science, as well as the roles of different ways applied science can be funded, and implications of these funding mechanisms. 
  • Introduction to Biology: Biology is the study of life and hence knowledge of plant and animal cell biology is fundamental to understanding wider concepts in biology. This unit also introduces key themes in human, environmental and ecological sciences to provide a sound underpinning in knowledge for future studies. 
  • Introduction to Psychology: This unit is designed to prepare you for advanced coursework in psychology. You will complete the unit with a good understanding of the various areas of psychology and how they seek to explain behaviour. 
  • Mathematics in Science: You will build your confidence in mathematics, in order to perform calculations on a range of scientific data from biology, chemistry and psychology and to be able to represent the findings in an appropriate format, including graphs. In order to carry this out, it is essential to be able to convert the data between systems of units and to understand how to present very large and very small numbers in standard form. Basic statistical analysis of tabulated data will be carried out to introduce the concept of confidence limits and familiarisation of statistical testing.
  • Foundation Year Project: You will carry out a research task on scientific topics chosen by the unit leader which you will be able to conduct a scientific investigation on. You will devise your own investigation and produce a literature review as a final scientific report.

Year 1

Core units

  • Experimental Methods & Statistical Analysis: This unit will introduce you to the planning, designing and conducting of experiments and research studies as well as the analysis and effective communication of experimental and research study findings.
  • Qualitative Research Methods: The unit will continue to develop your ability to plan, design and conduct experiments and research studies as well as the analysis and effective communication of experimental and research study findings.
  • Biological & Cognitive Psychology: Examines the relationship between the biology of the brain and how we process information, think and make decisions.
  • Social Psychology & Individual Differences: Discover the ways in which human behaviour is affected by the social context in which it occurs and how behaviour differs between individuals.
  • Developmental & Clinical Psychology: Explores developmental change cross the life-span through theory, research and practice. You’ll gain an understanding of the concepts and principles of clinical psychology in this unit.
  • Human Computer Interaction: Explores how differences between individuals affect the way technology is perceived and used while gaining an understanding of the ways in which human behaviour is affected by computer software and hardware.

Year 2

Core units

  • Statistics & Research Methods: Further developing experimental and non-experimental research skills, statistical analysis, interpretation and reporting of research findings.
  • Research Methods & Analysis: Continuing from Statistics & Research Methods, this is the final Research Methods unit before the final year project.
  • Developmental & Applied Cyberpsychology: This unit will further your knowledge and understanding of the concepts and principles of developmental psychology. Also, the unit examines the impact of the internet and online applications on individuals, groups, organisations and society.
  • Personality, Intelligence & Social Psychology: Explores the measurement of differences in personality and intelligence, identity and self-perception, attitudes, social cognition, and group processes.
  • Biological Psychology: The study of the neural correlates of various core brain functions and impairment associated with brain damages. This unit will develop your analytical thinking, synthetic thinking and your ability to search for, recognise and critically evaluate information.
  • Cognition & Language: Examines the psychology of attention, memory, and problem-solving. Also explores the effects of brain damage (e.g. aphasia, spatial neglect).

Optional placements

You may choose to complete an optional 4-week work placement between your second and final year or an optional 30-week minimum work placement which can be carried out anywhere in the world. Placements offer a chance to gain experience and make contacts for the future.

Final year

Core units

  • Psychology Project: You will have the opportunity to conduct your own research allowing you to explore in depth an area in cyberpsychology by working one-to-one with a member of academic staff to develop a research idea, design your own experiment, gather data, analyse it, and finally bring it all together with a written scientific report of your work. The research areas will draw from staff expertise which touch upon a wide range of fascinating topics and methodologies using departmental resources, including experimental labs, observational suits, eye-tracking, electroencephalography (EEG), Transcranial Electric Stimulation (TES), and Virtual Reality lab. If required, you will receive individual support and training on this equipment. In addition, we offer the possibility to gain invaluable experience conducting applied research with some of our external collaborators, including the NHS and Dorset Police, on projects with ‘real-world’ application.
  • Psychology of Social Media & Videogames: You will critically examine, evaluate and understand the impact of social media and videogames on individuals, groups, organisations and society, using psychological theories and methods.
  • Cybersecurity & Cyberwarfare: In this unit you will study and understand the psychological factors that determine how individuals engage with cybersecurity, either as targets, perpetrators, designers or practitioners.

Option units (choose two):

  • Forensic Psychology: This examines current research at the forefront of knowledge exploring the application of psychology in forensic contexts.
  • Memory & Decision Making: This unit builds a comprehensive understanding of key contemporary issues in memory research and decision-making research.
  • Mind, Brain & Evolution: Through comparative psychology study the course will consider the differences between humans and animals, explore how the mind can be unmade after a stroke and examine consequences of mental disorders.
  • Neuroimaging: Acquire in-depth technical knowledge and understanding of various neuroimaging and neuroscientific techniques, including practice.
  • Applied Clinical Psychology: Using current research and clinical experience, the emphasis will be on exploring therapeutic practice, investigating NHS, local authority and third-sector service provision, and understanding the role of service users and carers in recovery from mental illness.  
  • Mind Over Matter in Medicine: This module will teach you an understanding of key issues in placebo, nocebo, hypnosis, suggestibility and clinical communication research.  This includes learning about the experimental, medical and neuroscience techniques used as well as the theoretical constructs that seek to explain suggestibility.
  • Face Recognition & its Disorders: In this unit, you will gain a detailed understanding of the key models and contemporary debates in face processing research, and develop critical evaluation skills in the assessment of research papers.
  • Health Psychology: This unit will provide you with an understanding of the role of psychology in promoting health and well-being, and the impact of this as we grow older.
  • Educational Psychology & Special Educational Needs (SEN):  An introduction to educational psychology, SEN, labelling and inclusive education. You will discuss how psychological theories and research have influenced our understanding of child learning and teaching, and consider the effects on schools and teachers.
  • Cultural Psychology: This unit focuses on human behaviour and neural correlates of human mind across cultures, and the underlying theories. The cross-cultural difference of psychological phenomena will be highlighted in the context of a globalised, multiple-culture world.
  • Current Trends in Cognitive & Clinical Neuroscience: You will acquire comprehensive knowledge about the current trends in clinical and cognitive neuroscience as well as neuropsychological research and practice and related methodologies in order to be able to critically evaluate models and evidence in the research field.
  • Counselling Psychology: Using current research and practical experience, you’ll acquire an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the concepts and principles relating to real-world applications of counselling psychology.
  • Emotions, Mental Health & Affective Neuroscience: This unit will explore the role of emotions in various mental illnesses and the link between emotions and cognition.
  • Psychology of Sexualities: You’ll think critically about how sex categories, sexual identities and gender are experienced and interpreted by individuals, and how they are influenced by genetic and environmental factors
Cyberpsychology MSc Postgraduate taught Course | Nottingham Trent University

psychology low entry requirements

What’s Psychology?
Psychology is the study of how and why people think and act in the way they do. During a Psychology degree, you’ll explore a wide range of scientific methodology and theoretical ideas to gain insight into how factors such as biology, genetics and culture affect human thoughts, feelings and behaviours.

Psychology degree entry requirements
The minimum UCAS tariff points required to study psychology range from 80 points (CDD at A Level) to 152 points (A*AA at A Level).

Psychology Degree Entry Requirements

Type Minimum Grades/Points Required (with Foundation Year) Minimum Grades/Points Required Maximum Grades/Points Required Average Grades/Points Required
UCAS Points 32 80 152 112
A-Levels EE CDD AAA BBC BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma PP MMP-DM DDD DMM
International Baccalaureate 20 26 42 32

What subjects do I need to study Psychology?

A Levels
For most universities, you’ll need to have studied at least one science or Maths-based subject at A Level (this includes Psychology; Biology; Chemistry; Physics; Mathematics; Geography; Economics; Statistics; Computing). Typically, general studies or critical thinking subjects are not accepted.

BTECs
You can be accepted onto most Psychology degree courses with a BTEC qualification. You’ll need a DDM in a science-based subject for the top universities, though you could find a place elsewhere with as little as MMP.

GCSEs
You’ll also need to have good GCSE grades, with most universities requiring English, Mathematics and Science at grade C/4 or higher.

International Baccalaureate
Universities with slightly higher entry requirements will ask that you have a 6, 6, 6 at Higher Level. Some universities require a 6 in Higher Level maths, a science subject or both. A grade 5 in Standard Level English is often needed.

If your UCAS points total doesn’t meet the minimum entry requirements, then you could consider studying for a Psychology degree integrated with a foundation year. Foundation years help prepare students without the necessary qualifications for degree-level learning in their chosen subject. Once you’ve completed the foundation year, you’ll go into year one of the degree programme.

Entry requirements for a Psychology degree with an integrated foundation year range from 32 – 80 UCAS points. While courses with foundation years are much easier to get on to, they are more expensive. In most cases, the foundation year will be charged at the same rate as a year on the degree, adding up to £9,250 to the cost of your education.

Foundation courses you may wish to consider include:

Psychology with a Foundation Year BSc (Hons) – University of West London
Psychology with a Foundation Year (Integrated Degree) BSc (Hons) – Staffordshire University
Psychology with Criminology (with Foundation Year) BSc (Hons) – Teesside University
Psychology with Foundation BSc (Hons) – University of Westminster, London
Best universities for Psychology in the UK
According to the Complete University Guide League Tables 2022, the best universities for Psychology include:

University of Wales Trinity Saint David (ranked 1st for Student Satisfaction)

University of Cambridge (ranked 1st for Graduate Prospects)

Oxford University (ranked 1st Overall and 1st for Research Quality)
Other universities in the Top 10 for Psychology include: University of St Andrews, University of Bath and University College London.

How to compare Psychology courses
You can compare Psychology courses easily using Whatuni. The first step is to enter ‘Psychology’, which will give you a list of all the Psychology courses available in the UK. To personalise your search, click ‘YOUR GRADES’ and fill out your grades in the onscreen form.

Psychology courses listed on Whatuni

You can then use the other filters to further personalise the results by the things that might be important to you. Once you’ve narrowed down the results, you can browse through them, clicking on the course name to see the full course information, including course outline, module choices, entry requirements, fee information and key course stats.

Details of a psychology course on Whatuni

Here are some factors to consider when comparing Psychology courses:

Module choices
Not all Psychology courses are created equal. Module choices can vary wildly between courses so make sure to check that the modules on offer interest you and fit in with the career path you want to take.

For example, City, University of London gives students the opportunity to specialise in one of four areas of Psychology at the end of their second year. The University of Salford also gives you the opportunity to specialise to undertake a supervised research project of your own. Other universities may not offer so much flexibility, so it’s worth checking.

Course accreditation
One important factor to consider when comparing Psychology courses is whether they are accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) and provide you with Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) upon completion of the course. This is vital if you want to pursue a career as a registered clinical psychologist.

Placement year opportunities
Some Psychology degrees offer a professional placement year as part of their course, where you can gain experience working in a real-life clinical setting. This experience could help boost your chances of finding work after you’ve graduated.

A few examples of Psychology courses with placement years include:

Psychology (with placement) BSc (Hons) – University of Bath
Psychology with a Professional Placement Year BSc (Hons) – King’s College London
Psychology (with a professional placement year) BSc (Hons) – University of Sussex
Psychology with Placement Year BSc (Hons) – Keele University
Psychology with a Placement Year BSc (Hons) – University of Kent
How to compare Psychology courses in Clearing
You’ll be able to see what Psychology courses are available and compare them, using Whatuni’s Clearing tool when Clearing opens at the beginning of July. Some courses may even lower their entry requirements in Clearing.

Pre-register for Clearing in the meantime. You’ll receive regular advice leading up to Clearing, have access to Whatuni’s Clearing guide and be able to save and compare Psychology courses once Clearing begins.

What if you can’t find a Psychology course in Clearing?
If you can’t find a psychology course that’s right for you in Clearing, don’t worry. There are alternative options available:

Apply for a joint honours courses: Joint honours courses give students the opportunity to study two subjects in equal measure. If you’ve got your heart set on a particular university, but can’t get a place on their Psychology course, they might have a joint honours course with Psychology included that you apply for instead. That way you can still study the subject you want, at the place you want to study it. The good news is that many joint honours courses are accredited by the BPS too.
Apply for Clearing courses in similar subjects: Courses in subjects such as Youth Studies, Counselling, Mental Health and Psychotherapy all cover some aspects of psychological theory and practice, so are worth looking at as alternatives. Many of these will not be BPS-accredited though, so think carefully about what you want to do post-graduation before making any decisions.
Study a Psychology foundation degree: Not to be confused with a foundation year, a foundation degree is a standalone qualification (FdA or FdSc) equivalent to two-thirds of a bachelor’s (BA, BSc) degree. They usually take two years to complete and are more vocational in nature. The minimum UCAS points for psychology foundation degrees are usually a lot lower than a bachelor’s degree (48 points or EEE at A Level) and can be topped up into a full degree with further study at a later date.
Study a Psychology HND/HNC: Higher National Diplomas (HNDs) and Higher National Certificates (HNCs) are similar to foundation degrees in that they are vocational-based courses worth one-third (HNC) or two-thirds (HND) of a full degree. They take less time to complete and have much lower entry requirements. They can also be topped up to a full degree with further study.
Note: Foundation, HNC and HND courses might not be BPS-accredited, so again, think carefully about what you want to do post-graduation before applying to these types of courses.

Take a gap year and resit your exams: If you have your heart set on a specific course, then consider taking a year out to study more and resit your exams either in autumn or next year. During your gap year you could even gain some relevant work experience to boost your UCAS application.
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BSc (Hons) Cyberpsychology | Bournemouth University

cyberpsychology undergraduate

Why study BSc (Hons) Cyberpsychology at BU?
Develop a well-rounded knowledge of all areas of psychology
Learn a range of research skills and methods to investigate traditional and online behaviour and apply that knowledge in a variety of contexts – including your own independent research
Use state-of-the art facilities such as eye tracking technology to help you understand how people, groups, organisations and societies interact with, and make use of, technology
Work with world-leading researchers on projects through the Research Apprenticeship Scheme – many of our students have published work with members of staff
Opportunity to take an optional 4-week or 30-week placement in industry to give you essential real-world experience and begin building a network of professional contacts
94% of graduates felt academic staff on this course were good at explaining things.
Find out more about the content of this course.

Foundation Year: We have a Foundation Year option for UK students who do not meet the entry requirements for the degree course. This additional year of study will give you a grounding in the scientific skills needed to prepare you for the Cyberpsychology degree, building your confidence, knowledge and skills for further study. After successful completion of the Foundation Year, you will progress to the full degree and begin your Cyberpsychology study.

Accreditations
This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society, so when you graduate with at least a Second Class Honours, you are eligible for Graduate Basis for Chartership, the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

See what it’s like to study on this course
Key information
Next start date:
September 2022, September 2023

Location:
Bournemouth University, Talbot Campus

Duration:
3 years with optional 4-week placement, or 4 years with a minimum 30-week placement. Foundation year: 4 years with optional 4-week placement, or 5 years with a minimum 30-week placement

Accreditations:
British Psychological Society (BPS)

Required subjects:
All subjects considered

Entry requirements:
For September 2022 entry: 112-128 UCAS tariff points including a minimum of 2 A-levels or equivalent. BTEC Extended Diploma: DMM. Foundation Year: 48-72 UCAS tariff points. For more information check out our full entry requirements.

International entry requirements:
For September 2022 entry: If English is not your first language you’ll need IELTS (Academic) 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each of the four components or equivalent. For more information check out our international entry requirements.

September 2022
£9,250 (UK, ROI & CI) £15,250 (Int’l)
per year
Placement year: £1,850
Foundation year: £9,250 (UK, ROI& CI only)
Important information about fees
Scholarships
Your academic, sporting or musical achievements may be rewarded with a scholarship. Find out more.

Related courses
Take a look at some of the other courses that we offer at BU.

BSc (Hons) Psychology (with Foundation Year option)
BSc (Hons) Cyber Security Management
BA (Hons) Sociology
BA (Hons) Sociology & Criminology
Research in practice
video games
BU research uncovers that young people who play video games have increased moral reasoning skills
Cyber Security lab
See how Psychology is integrating with Cyber Security
Planning your future
Psychology facilities
Open Days and visits
Accommodation
Campus life
Fees and funding
Additional Learning Support
Course details
On this course you will be taught by a range of staff with relevant expertise and knowledge appropriate to the content of the unit. This will include senior academic staff, qualified professional practitioners, demonstrators, technicians and research students.

How you will be assessed
You will be assessed by coursework culminating in your final year research project, and you will also undertake group work and written exams. The assessment methods for each unit can be found on the programme profile in the programme specification for your course.

Download the programme specification (pdf 256kb)Download the foundation year programme specification (pdf 338kb)

Foundation Year
Year 1
Year 2
Optional placements
Final year
Programme specification
Placements
At BU, we recognise that placements are extremely valuable and can give you a head start when it comes to your future career. That’s why we now offer every new student the opportunity to undertake a work placement as part of their course.

A placement year is a vital part in developing well-rounded and industry-ready graduates. What’s more, you can also choose to take your placement abroad, giving you the opportunity to develop yourself personally, academically, and professionally and gain skills to help you stand out in the job market.

Find out about BU students’ experiences on placementsAll you need to know about placements

How your placement will benefit you
What support will be available?
How long will my placement be?
Our placement students have previously worked with
Entry requirements
This course requires 112–128 UCAS tariff points including a minimum of 2 A-levels or equivalent. We are happy to consider a combination of qualifications and grades to meet the overall tariff, for example A-levels A*BC, ABB, BBC or ACC, BTECs DDM or DMM. You can use the UCAS calculator to see how your qualifications equate to UCAS tariff points.

If you do not meet these you may want to consider our Foundation Year, a one-year course that will prepare you for degree-level study.

Calculate your UCAS tariff points

2022 entry

Numeracy and literacy requirements (e.g. GCSEs) GCSE English Language or English Literature and Mathematics grade 4 (or grade C in the old grading system). We also accept iGCSEs, Key Skills and Functional Skills and other qualifications at Level 2 of the National Qualifications Framework. See all of the equivalencies.
A-level and AS levels 112–128 UCAS tariff points from a minimum of two A-levels.
Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate – Skills Challenge Certificate We accept this qualification, but it must be accompanied by an A-level sized qualification to meet the overall UCAS tariff.
Access to HE Diploma 112–128 UCAS tariff points with any combination of Distinction, Merit, Pass grades.
BTEC National
Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit (112 UCAS tariff points)
Diploma: Distinction, Distinction (112 UCAS tariff points)
Foundation Diploma/ 90-credit Diploma: We accept this qualification, but it must be accompanied by an A-level sized qualification to meet the overall UCAS tariff
Extended Certificate/ Subsidiary Diploma: We accept this qualification as part of the overall tariff.
Cambridge International Pre-U Diploma 112–128 UCAS tariff points from a minimum of two principal subjects.
Cambridge Technical
Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit (112 UCAS tariff points)
Diploma: Distinction, Distinction (112 UCAS tariff points)
Subsidiary Diploma: We accept this qualification, but it must be accompanied by an A-level sized qualification to meet the overall UCAS tariff
Introductory Diploma: We accept this qualification, but it must be accompanied by an A-level sized qualification to meet the overall UCAS tariff.
Extended Project Qualification We accept this qualification, but it must be accompanied by two A-level sized qualifications to meet the overall UCAS tariff.
International Baccalaureate Certificates 112–128 UCAS tariff points from a minimum of two Higher Level certificates.
International Baccalaureate (Diploma) An overall score of 30–31 points.
Scottish Highers 112–120 UCAS tariff points from a minimum of four Scottish Highers.
Scottish Advanced Highers 112–120 UCAS tariff points from a minimum of two Scottish Advanced Highers.
T Levels We will recognise T Level qualifications at a suitable level (and in a suitable subject, if applicable).
Foundation Year entry requirements
Numeracy and literacy requirements There are no GCSE requirements. The Foundation Year will cover these skills in preparation for degree study.
For September 2022 entry 48–72 UCAS tariff points.
International entry requirements
You can find details of the international qualifications we accept, and what level of study they apply to, on our entry requirements for non-UK students’ page.

Please see below some examples of the qualifications for entry onto Year 1 for September 2022 entry:

Chinese Senior High School Graduation Certificate (Huikao) average 80%, or Gaokao 66-76%. Grade depends on the course
Hong Kong HKDSE Diploma (4,4,3 to 4,4,4 from three subjects). Grade depends on the course
All India Senior School Certificate Examination (Standard XII) 65-75%
Italian Esame di Stato with 65-75%. Grade depends on the course
Titulo de Bachillerato with 6.5 or 7.5. Grade depends on course
English language requirements
If English is not your first language, you will need to provide evidence that you can understand English to a satisfactory level. English language requirements for this course are normally:

For September 2022 entry: IELTS (Academic) 6.0 with minimum 5.5 in each component, or equivalent.

View further information about our English language requirements.

If you do not meet the English language requirement for your degree then why not join our Pre-Sessional English course? Successful completion of our Pre-Sessional English course will meet your English language requirement.

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