genetics bachelor’s degree programs

Good Geneticists have a passion & curiosity related to the genetic basis of health and disease. If you want to be successful at the job, you must have a patience, good communication skills & perseverance. Those students in interested to make their career in genetics, should take science and mathematics as possible in the high school and college.

A genetics degree can lead to a career in health, scientific research or industry and also provides a range of skills that can be used in many other sectors. Read more about Genetics Bachelor Degree, list of careers in genetics, jobs in genetics salary, high paying jobs in genetics, and entry level genetics jobs.

Cell and Molecular Biology B.S. – Programs

Genetics Bachelor Degree

What can I do with a bachelors in genetics?

Careers in Human Genetics

  • Biotech Sales/Marketing. Clinical Research Associate. …
  • Bioinformatician. Community College Professor. …
  • Bioethicist. Intellectual Property/Patent Attorney*
  • Independent Clinical Researcher. Physician/Clinical Geneticist.
  • Audiologist*^ Biocurator. …
  • Clinical Laboratory Geneticist* Medical Science Liaison.

What Is Involved in Genetics Studies?

Genetics is the science of heredity, genes, DNA and molecules. Throughout your completion of a Bachelor of Science in Genetics, you’ll have internship opportunities, research labs and current events seminars with prominent guest speakers. When you begin your studies, you’ll need a strong academic background in geometry, algebra, chemistry, biology and physics.

Typical course topics you may encounter in a genetics major include life sciences, calculus, chemistry, physics and cellular biology. You will explore different branches of genetics as well, such as:

  • Transmission
  • Evolutionary genetics
  • Molecular genetics
  • Non-Mendelian inheritance
  • Parametric analysis
  • Genetic epidemiology
  • Cytogenetics
Common CoursesLife sciences, calculus, chemistry and cellular biology
Additional Educational ExperiencesDepending upon the institution, students may have the ability to work with faculty on genetics projects
Learning EnvironmentsTypically only campus-based degrees are offered
Possible CareersTeacher, food technologist, soil and plant scientist, agricultural scientist
Job Outlook (2019-2029)*6% (for agricultural and food scientist)
Median Salary (2020)*$68,830 (for agricultural and food scientist)

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Will There Be Laboratory Research Opportunities?

Depending on the university, you may get the chance to work individually with faculty members on their research projects. You could study the ways in which cancer cells become genetically different from the patient’s own cells, making them unstable. If the DNA molecule itself fascinates you, you might consider research in DNA repair mechanisms or the gene regulation process that activates certain parts of DNA. Working with faculty members on such research projects will gain you credit hours toward the completion of your genetics degree.

Can I Earn It Online?

There is no fully online Bachelor of Science in Genetics degree program available from reputable universities. However, several universities offer specific genetics courses online. Some of these award academic credit to successful students. Others provide continuing education units, and still others are free non-credit resources for the public to use.

What Can I Do With This Degree?

When you successfully complete a major in genetics, you open up many possibilities for your future! One such path is to pursue advanced education in genetics; for example, completing a master’s or doctoral degree in genetics will award you far more job opportunities in the field.

If you wish to apply for a job right out of college, a bachelor’s degree in genetics may allow you to obtain jobs such as agricultural scientist, food technologist, soil and plant scientist, animal scientist and high school science teacher. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, if you prefer to stop your education at the bachelor’s degree level, you are more likely to be considered for a non-scientist job in such fields as marketing, sales and research management.

Vanderbilt Human Genetics Program | Vanderbilt University

Human Genetics Phd Programs

Howard University

Department of Genetics and Human Genetics

The graduate programs in Genetics & Human Genetics are designed to confer the training standards that will develop students for degrees of Doctorate of Philosophy Master’s, and M.D./Ph.D. degree(s). The graduate program is an interdepartmental entity built on a diverse platform.

The program is associated with the department of Pediatrics and department of Biology where students work creatively in their field of special interest but and be able to relate application and relevance to related clinical and science disciplines.

Overview

The degree programs are designed to provide a curricular foundation in human genetics for all enrolled students during their first year.Following this, guided by their academic adviser, students elect to pursue their area of interest in genetics . This is accomplished through a combination of elective courses offered in the Department and other departments of the University, as well as in the Washington Area Consortium of Universities. The Masters thesis and Doctoral dissertation research interests likewise can reflect a broad range of interests, provided a suitable research mentor is identified in the graduate faculty. 

This training program design takes into account the fact that genetics is increasingly relevant within the framework of multiple biomedical research and scholarly pursuits. The program design also is intended to foster the important principle of collaborative research and scholarship among biomedical disiplines.

What Can You Do With A Master’s Degree In Genetics

Job options

Jobs directly related to your degree include:

Jobs where your degree would be useful include:

Remember that many employers accept applications from graduates with any degree subject, so don’t restrict your thinking to the jobs listed here.

Take a few minutes to answer the Job Match quiz and find out what careers would suit youTry Job Match

Work experience

Practical experience gained through work shadowing and placements in the laboratory or field may increase your chances of finding genetics-related work. It’s also useful to build up knowledge of the range of techniques used in the area. Some courses provide the opportunity for a year out in industry or with a research institute, or some form of shorter work placement either in the UK or abroad.

It’s a good idea to gain some experience within industry as well as academia so you can compare the two and decide which you prefer. Temporary work within a healthcare environment, for example in a hospital, may also prove useful in helping you explore career ideas.

You might decide to do some volunteering with organisations that specialise in researching genetic conditions or supporting people with inherited disorders.

Search for placements and find out more about work experience and internships.

Typical employers

Many careers relating to genetics are based in the health services, so employers tend to be hospitals, pharmaceutical companies and universities.

However, opportunities within food and drink companies, the health and beauty care industry, and research and consultancy companies are also available.

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) is comprised of seven Research Councils, Innovate UK and Research England. The Research Councils have laboratories that recruit scientists, but you’ll usually need a higher degree.

You may want to consider opportunities in industries related to biological sciences, such as biotechnology, biomedical research, agricultural and horticultural, conservation and environmental assessment. It’s also possible to use your skills in fields like teaching, business, finance and retail.

Find information on employers in healthcarescience and pharmaceuticals, and other job sectors.

Skills for your CV

Studying genetics provides you with specialist subject knowledge, as well as skills in scientific protocol, biological research and laboratory practice, which is essential if you intend to pursue a career in a genetics-related job.

Employers are also interested in the broader skills you acquire, such as:

  • recording, analysis and interpretation of masses of scientific data
  • logical thinking, numeracy and computing skills
  • awareness of current issues and ethical debates
  • communication skills including report writing and making presentations
  • time management
  • problem solving
  • self-reliance and initiative
  • business awareness
  • teamwork and strong interpersonaal skills.

Further study

Many genetics-related employers value postgraduate study and the technical and research skills you develop to a higher level, as well as other transferable skills such as critical analysis and report writing. Postgraduate study at Masters and PhD level is particularly useful for jobs in research.

There are many options at postgraduate level to enhance the knowledge gained in your first degree. Some subjects are directly related, such as medical and molecular genetics, while others derive from genetics, like immunology and pharmacology.

For more information on further study and to find a course that interests you, see Masters degrees and search for postgraduate courses in genetics.

What do genetics graduates do?

Graduates use the transferable skills gained from their degree to enter a variety of professions, with just a fifth (21%) becoming science professionals. This includes biochemists, medical scientists, laboratory technicians, and natural and social science professionals.

DestinationPercentage
Employed25.5
Further study59
Working and studying6.3
Unemployed5.3
Other3.9

Graduate destinations for genetics

Type of workPercentage
Science professionals17
Business, HR and finance15.1
Technicians and other professionals12.5
Education professionals7
Other48.3

There are a lot of career opportunities in the field of biology, biomedical and life Sciences. The job opportunity for a genetics degree holder is continuing to expand. The genetic employees are not sufficient now, that’s why the demand of genetics continues to increase. Geneticists can work in various capacities for many different types of employers. Some Employment area where you work after studying genetics course:

What Jobs Can You Get With A Masters In Genetics

  • Hospitals
  • Military
  • DNA Forensics Department
  • Universities
  • Consultancies
  • Pharmaceutical Industry & Suppliers
  • Agricultural Firms
  • Research Institutes
  • Animal Breeding Industry

Some of the Job Profiles are:

  • Assistant Professor
  • Genetics Laboratory Technician
  • Clinical Geneticist
  • Regulatory Process Manager
  • Biotech Sales Engineer
  • Consultant
  • Museum Educator
  • Nutritionist
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Senior Scientific Officer
  • Principal Plant Breeder
  • Channel Enablement Specialist
  • Data Specialist – Advanced Analytics
  • Technical Solution Manager

Some of the major employers geneticist in India are:

  • AIIMS
  • Tata Memorial Centre
  • Indian Society of Cell Biology
  • Bcs-Insilico Biology

LABORATORY TECHNICIAN 

As a laboratory technician, you get to do all the nitty gritty work, like collecting samples. But you also get to study and take part in conducting tests. So it’s not all nitty gritty, at least.

The majority of your day as a laboratory technician will be spent in a lab, surrounded by bodily fluids, chemicals, and organic matter. If any of that makes you squirmish just thinking about it, then it’s not too late to turn back.

Employers prefer that you have a bachelor’s degree before pursuing a position as a laboratory tech, but associate degrees are also welcome. Before you start, you’ll need to rack up a few years of experience in lab work. It probably wouldn’t be a good thing if you blew up the lab on your first day.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a laboratory technician. For example, did you know that they make an average of $19.88 an hour? That’s $41,344 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 2% and produce 1,200 job opportunities across the U.S.

There are certain skills that many laboratory technicians have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed ability to use technology, interpersonal skills and observation skills.

RESEARCH ASSOCIATE 

As a research associate, you can rest assured you’ll be earning valuable experience in the position that will look spectacular on your resume. Employers will certainly be impressed with your resume dressed up with a research associate work experience.

Research associates spend a lot of their time making sure research projects stay on track to be completed on deadline. But they also relay information between departmental sections. Research associates help with tests and studies when they’re needed to and have a hand in advanced experiments from time-to-time.

From economics to the auto industry, research associates are needed and welcomed in nearly every industry. Which means you’ll have a lot of job opportunities to sift through. Of course, having a lot of job opportunities at your fingertips is never a bad thing. I doubt anyone would scoff at that.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a research associate. For example, did you know that they make an average of $25.55 an hour? That’s $53,142 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 8% and produce 10,600 job opportunities across the U.S.

There are certain skills that many research associates have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed observational skills, technical skills and analytical skills.

LABORATORY ASSISTANT 

As a laboratory assistant, your main job is to help out in a lab. That help can come from many different ways, such as processing samples, classifying results, and being able to record any findings.

As part of the education, you’ll need to become a laboratory assistant, you’ll definitely need to have an understanding of basic lab techniques and equipment. The majority of your day will be spent side-by-side with scientists conducting lab tests and researching.

It doesn’t take much to become a laboratory assistant. Typically, you can become one with a high school diploma. But an associate’s or bachelor’s degree definitely makes you look more appealing to employers. Plus, it gives you the opportunity to play around with lab equipment.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a laboratory assistant. For example, did you know that they make an average of $14.76 an hour? That’s $30,701 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 7% and produce 5,700 job opportunities across the U.S.

There are certain skills that many laboratory assistants have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed analytical skills, communication skills and observational skills.

The degree programs are designed to provide a curricular foundation in human genetics for all enrolled students during their first year.Following this, guided by their academic adviser, students elect to pursue their area of interest in genetics . This is accomplished through a combination of elective courses offered in the Department and other departments of the University, as well as in the Washington Area Consortium of Universities. The Masters thesis and Doctoral dissertation research interests likewise can reflect a broad range of interests, provided a suitable research mentor is identified in the graduate faculty. 

This training program design takes into account the fact that genetics is increasingly relevant within the framework of multiple biomedical research and scholarly pursuits. The program design also is intended to foster the important principle of collaborative research and scholarship among biomedical disiplines.

Genetics Graduate Programs Requirements

To be accepted into the Graduate Program in Genetics and Human Genetics, students must have a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and a GPA of at least 3.0 or B equivalent. In addition, students must meet the University requirement(s) to take the Graduate Record Examination (and the TOEFL if applicable).

Students with a bachelor degree may enter the graduate program at the Masters level or directly into the Ph.D. program. Eligibility to be considered for direct admission as a Ph.D. student requires a cumulative GPA greater than 3.2 and prior research and/or training experience in during undergraduate school or during a previous Master’s degree

Applicants are required to submit these items for consideration of acceptance and review of potential for success:

  • Three (3) letters of recommendation a statement of interest in genetics,
  • official transcript(s)
  • and the most recent Graduate Record Examination scores.

Course Requirements

There are two curricular tracks for master’s degree students. Those pursuing laboratory research as part of their training take similar core courses in the first year as doctoral students (see under Doctoral Degree). Students focused on the computational and statistical aspects of human genetics may substitute advanced courses in biomathematics or in computational and statistical genetics for the more biologically oriented courses. In addition, all master’s students must take the advanced human genetics course (Human Genetics 236A-236B) and the ethics in human genetics course (Human Genetics C220). Elective courses must be taken to complete the minimum 36 units required for the master’s degree. No more than two independent study courses (eight units) in the 500 series may be applied toward the minimum course requirement for the master’s degree, and only one of these (four units) may be applied toward the minimum graduate course requirement for the degree.

Students entering the program through ACCESS follow ACCESS course requirements in the first year. In Fall Quarter, students take Biological Chemistry/Chemistry CM253, which provides grounding in the chemical and biological properties of nucleic acids and proteins. In Winter Quarter, students may select from several courses that emphasize cellular function and organization (e.g., Biological Chemistry CM267A-M267B, or a course in Molecular Cell Biology). Knowledge of nucleic acid and protein structure and function and cell biology is essential for genetics. In Spring Quarter, students may select from several specialty courses; for those who have already decided to specialize in human genetics, Biological Chemistry CM248 (Molecular Genetics, a course on basic concepts and techniques in the genetics of lower and higher organisms) is recommended. As part of the ACCESS Program during the first year, student also take three two-unit seminar courses on current research topics, and a course on ethics in research. The Human Genetics faculty offers at least one seminar course in the field of human genetics. Human Genetics 236A-236B, a six-unit course, and C220, a two-unit course, are required of predoctoral students in Human Genetics, preferably during the second year of training. Four additional units of coursework are required for the doctoral degree, preferably in seminar format.

Students who enter the department directly have a choice between two tracks: (1) a laboratory track, which has course requirements similar to those of the ACCESS Program, and (2) a computational human genetics track, which has course requirements that include molecular genetics, advanced human genetics, and ethics. Students who elect the computational human genetics track also are required to take eight units of statistics and eight units of approved electives in each of the areas of (1) computational and statistical genetics, and (2) bioinformatics, genomics, and proteomics.

Written and Oral Qualifying Examinations

Academic Senate regulations require all doctoral students to complete and pass University written and oral qualifying examinations prior to doctoral advancement to candidacy. Also, under Senate regulations the University oral qualifying examination is open only to the student and appointed members of the doctoral committee. In addition to University requirements, some graduate programs have other pre-candidacy examination requirements. What follows in this section is how students are required to fulfill all of these requirements for this doctoral program.

Students are allowed to nominate a doctoral committee after satisfactory performance in courses and laboratory rotations, as judged by faculty or a designated faculty committee. The University Oral Qualifying Examination must be passed before students are advanced to candidacy for the doctoral degree. This examination is administered in two parts by a doctoral committee composed of at least four faculty members selected by the student and approved by the department.

Before advancement to candidacy, two short written research proposals are prepared and must be successfully defended orally by the student. The proposals must include the scientific rationale, experimental methods, anticipated results and interpretations, and bibliography. The first proposal is an original proposal formulated by the student on a topic in human genetics that is not directly related to the proposed dissertation research. It is to be completed by the end of the second year of training or, at the latest, at the beginning of year three. The second proposal covers the dissertation research and is to be completed by the end of year three. Students are evaluated on their understanding of the research they are undertaking for the dissertation, on their ability to identify an important scientific problem independently of their mentors, on their ability to devise appropriate and original experimental strategies, and on their ability to write clearly and concisely. For both proposals, the oral examination occurs a week or two after submission of the written proposals. The oral examination consists of a discussion of the proposals and of additional questions that probe the student’s general knowledge and understanding of human genetics.

The doctoral committee determines whether the student passes the examinations and advances to candidacy. The committee also determines whether a student who fails the examination is allowed to repeat it. If re-examination is allowed, the student is allowed to repeat the examination only once and this must be completed by the end of the next academic quarter. A student must successfully complete the written and oral qualifying examinations prior to beginning the fourth year of graduate study.

During their first semester, new graduate students participate in at least three laboratory rotations, each rotation being five weeks in duration. These rotations facilitate choosing a major professor and a research focus. Once associated with a particular mentor, an advisory committee of at least three additional professors is assembled. The majority of coursework for the Ph.D. is completed within approximately two years at the beginning of the program. Following the completion of this coursework, preliminary and oral examinations are taken. In addition to coursework and research, Ph.D. students are required to teach two semesters of undergraduate courses.

REQUIRED CORE COURSES

Number DepartmentCourse TitleCredit HoursSemester Offered
GN 701 GNMolecular Genetics3Fall
GN 702 GNCellular & Developmental Genetics3Spring
GN 703 GNPopulation & Quantitative Genetics3Spring
GN 810 (x2)* GNSpecial Topics in Genetics – Journal Club1Fall
GN 820** GNSpecial Problems, Professional Development3Alt. Spring
GN 850 GNProfessionalism & Ethics1Fall
ST 511 STExperimental Statistics for Biologists3Fall/Spring

University of Birmingham

BSc Biological Sciences (Genetics)

Start dateSeptemberDuration3 yearsUCAS codeC400Course TypeUndergraduate, Single HonoursFees£9,250 (Home – 2020-21)
£23,400 Fee Band 3a (International Students – 2020-21)
More detail

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Genetics is central to all areas of biology, from cellular differentiation and development, through reproduction, to biodiversity and conservation.

Genetics is a fast moving field; with the advent of new technologies that make genome sequencing almost routine, we are seeing rapid advances in our understanding of areas as diverse as human disease and the diversity of organisms living in the deep sea. 

The BSc Biological Sciences (Genetics) course builds on the BSc Biological Sciences course and allows you focus increasingly on modules covering elements of Genetics. This includes classical genetics, gene regulation, epigenetics and RNA processing all the way to genome science.

Royal Society of Biology - Accredited DegreeThis programme has been accredited by the Royal Society of Biology. Accredited degree programmes contain a solid academic foundation in biological knowledge and key skills, and prepare graduates to address the needs of employers.

In the third year, you have the option of doing a laboratory research project, where you work in a lab for most of the year. You are doing real research alongside PhD students and postdoctoral researchers, so you gain invaluable skills and learn in a much more personal settingParisha Katwa, BSc Biological Sciences

Why study this course?

  • We increasingly incorporate new areas of science relating to biology, such as bioinformatics, and the School has world leading facilities for research in genomics, structural biology and optical imaging.
  • In addition to the Genetics-focused content, you will encounter a broad range of topics on our courses, ranging from studies on the three-dimensional structure of individual molecules through to the study of whole ecosystems. Specialist field courses for those involved in the study of animals, plants and ecological aspects are also available.
  • Genetics and genomics are an integral part of research in the School of Biosciences. This expertise forms the foundation of research-led teaching in Biological Sciences (Genetics). Find out more about research in the School of Biosciences.
  • We pride ourselves in our ‘enquiry-based learning‘ strategy that will equip you with the skills to achieve full potential in your future career.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) latest updates and FAQs for future students and offer-holdersVisit our FAQsClose all sections

Modules

The modules described here are the ones that we currently offer and will give you a good idea of the range of subjects that we teach. However as our undergraduate teaching is research led and we constantly review our teaching to ensure that the modules that we offer are up to date there may be changes to module titles and content.

Please note: The modules listed on the website for this programme are regularly reviewed to ensure they are up-to-date and informed by the latest research and teaching methods. Unless indicated otherwise, the modules listed for this programme are for students starting in 2021. On rare occasions, we may need to make unexpected changes to compulsory modules after that date; in this event we will contact offer holders as soon as possible to inform or consult them as appropriate.

First Year

In the key first year Genetics module you will cover DNA structure and function, information flow, gene regulation and the genetics of bacteria and higher organisms. Along with all of the other students on the Biological Sciences programmes you will take other modules (listed below) designed to introduce you to all aspects of this broad subject discipline.

Compulsory modules:

Genetics I – Storage of genetic information, gene expression and regulation, mitosis and meiosis, gene linkage and chromosome mapping.

Personal and Academic Skills: Communication and Data Analysis

Personal and Academic Development

Fundamentals of Biochemistry – Fundamental biochemical processes taking place inside cells

Introduction to Evolution and Animal Biology |  Watch video – An overview of introduction from the pre-biotic era to Darwin and his impact. Natural selection, the origins of altruism and sexual reproduction, genetic determinants of evolution.

Cell Biology and Physiology – Tissues, organelles, reproduction and development.

Ecological Concepts and Plant Sciences – This module provides a broad overview of the biology of our environment, including topics such as climate change, conservation, ecophysiology and cell biology of plants.

Introduction to Microbiology  |   Watch video  – Broad introduction to microbiology with a focus on infectious disease, covering bacteria, fungi, protists, archaea and viruses

Second Year

In the second year Genetics module you will study the basis by which genetic variation arises and is transmitted from generation to generation. You will also look at the organisation, structure and dynamic nature of genomes, as well advanced topics in gene regulation in both bacteria and higher organisms, including man. In the core second year module Molecular Biology and its Applications you will study some of the more molecular aspects of genetics.

Genetics is central to all aspects of biology, you choose 4 other modules from the list below. If you are interested in genetics in the context of whole organisms you might choose the Animal and Plant modules, if you are more interested in molecular genetics you might choose Cell and Developmental Biology.

Compulsory modules:

Genetics II – Organisation of genes and genomes, generation of genetic diversity, gene transmission and analysis of problems in transmission and molecular genetics.

Communication and Skills in Biosciences – Science communication in videography, writing and speaking, ethics in science, analysis of the scientific literature.

Molecular Biology and its Applications – Genetic analysis and gene cloning, DNA fingerprinting and forensics, genomics and computational approaches to genetics.

Example optional modules may include:

Microbes and Man – The impact of microbes on humans, bacteria, fungi and viruses, common themes of infectious disease mechanisms.

Cell and Developmental Biology – Development of multicellular organisms, interaction between cells and the cellular matrix, regulation of stem cell function.

Animal Biology – This module explores how the central nervous system translates sensory stimuli to behaviour. Topics include comparative neurobiology, biological timekeeping, sensory biology, learning and behaviour and others.

Evolution of Humans and Other Animals – The primary aim of this module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of comparative animal biology in an evolutionary context.

Human Structure and Function – Human anatomy and how it relates to its function and evolutionary origin.

Critical Issues for 21st Century Ecosystems – Core skills in ecosystem knowledge 

Plant Sciences: from cells to the environment

Alpine and Glacial Ecology in Norway  |  Watch video

Field Course: Adaptations to Aquatic Environments  |  Watch videoAll field modules are optional and they each currently have an additional cost of £200 which covers the travel.

Final Year

The final year is made up of a combination of taught modules and independent study. It is here that the link between the teaching and the research in the school is particularly important. You can choose between 3 project options, a practical project, a literature review project or an education-focused project. All three options carry the weight of  2 taught final year modules and all three train you in skills such as study design, recording & documenting data, ethics & safety as well as data analysis & interpretation. 

Project options

Example optional modules may include:

Cancer Biology – Regulation of cell division and aberrations in malignant tumours, genetic bases of tumourigenesis, programmed cell death.

Human Evolution – Genetics and genomics, development of bipedalism, development of society and how humans’ activity applies selective pressure on the evolution of HIV.

Bacterial Gene Regulation – How genes are switched on or off in response to external stimuli, how control of gene expression can be explored experimentally.

Eukaryotic Gene Expression – Control of gene transcription, chromatin structure, pre-mRNA processing, mRNA translation and degradation.

Current developments and advances in Eukaryotic Genetics

Introduction to Teaching Biosciences in Schools

Research Methods in Microbiology

Global Challenge and Plant Science

Fees

Standard Home student fees 2021-22

For UK students beginning their studies in September 2021, the University of Birmingham will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. The fees for your first year of study will therefore be £9,250. Visit our tuition fees page for more information.

Standard international student fees 2021-22

Fee Band (Undergraduate)Full-time
Band 3a (Laboratory)£23,400

Learn more about fees and fundingAll field modules are optional and they each currently have an additional cost of £200 which covers the travel.

Scholarships
Learn more about our scholarships and awards


For EU students applying for the 2020/21 academic year

The UK Government has confirmed that EU students will continue to be eligible for ‘home fee status’ for entry in September 2020, and will continue to have access to financial support available via student loans for the duration of their course. For more information take a look at the gov.uk website.

EU Referendum

Answering your questions and concerns about the outcome of the EU referendum.

How To Apply

Apply through UCAS at www.ucas.com 
Learn more about applying

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