feminist theory online course

The ‘feminist theory course’ is designed as a means to understand the history, politics, and social changes that have pivoted around issues of gender. Our goal is to wrangle the kind of thinking and analysis that reveals the underlying principles of feminist theory online. This can be done by relying on empirical evidence. The course does not rest solely on literature written in the past, but examines twenty-first century feminist criticism and contemporary online sharing practices.

The Feminism Theory Online Course is the perfect solution for all those who have been perusing their local bookstore and have found nothing but boring, dusty tomes written by feminists. This online feminist course contains short videos that explain the basic principles of feminism; they are relevant and fun to watch.

This course will evaluate the rise and trajectory of the feminist movement and explicate concepts surrounding feminism. We will look at the ways in which feminism has developed, its organization around questions of gender, its mandate, and its contemporary import. We then open out the course into questions of feminist theory. Through case studies, literature, ethnography, and theory, we will examine why such analysis matters and why it is critical to our everyday lives.
INTENDED AUDIENCE  : Undergraduates, Graduates, Undergraduate Instructors, General AudiencePRE-REQUISITES     : NilSUPPORT INDUSTRY   :  NilSummary

Course Status :Completed
Course Type :Core
Duration :12 weeks
Start Date :27 Jan 2020
End Date :17 Apr 2020
Exam Date :26 Apr 2020 IST
Enrollment Ends :03 Feb 2020
Category :Humanities and Social Sciences
Credit Points :3
Level :Undergraduate

Course layout

Week 1 : Introduction, History and Vocabulary Week 2 : Key Concepts – 1 Week 3 : Key Concepts – 2Week 4 : Key Concepts – 3Week 5 : The Three Waves of Feminism Week 6 : The Feminist Body Week 7 : Indian Feminism  Week 8 : Feminism and Work/ LabourWeek 9 : Feminism in Film and Theatre Week 10 : Popular Culture, Social Media and FeminismWeek 11 : Gender, queer theory, and post-structuralismWeek 12 : Learnings and conclusions 

Books and references

  1. hooks, bell. Feminism is for everybody: Passionate Politics. Cambridge, MA: South End Press
  2. Hughes, Christina. 2002. Key Concepts in Feminist Theory and Research.New Delhi; London, California: Sage
  3. Menon, Nivedita. 2012. Seeing Like a Feminist. New Delhi: Zubaan.

Instructor bio

Profile photo

Prof. Mathangi Krishnamurthy

IIT MadrasMathangi Krishnamurthy is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, IIT Madras. She holds a PhD in anthropology from The University of Texas at Austin, and was an Andrew W.Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her areas of interest include the anthropology of work and gender, medical anthropology, urban studies, globalization, and affective labour. Her new book “1-800-Worlds: The Making of the Indian Call Centre Economy” published by OUP in 2018 chronicles the labour practices, life-worlds, and media atmospheres of Indian call centre workers, and locates them within the socio-political context of the new Indian middle classes

Course certificate

• The course is free to enroll and learn from. But if you want a certificate, you have to register and write the proctored exam conducted by us in person at any of the designated exam centres.
• The exam is optional for a fee of Rs 1000/- (Rupees one thousand only).
• Date and Time of Exams: 26th April 2020, Morning session 9am to 12 noon; Afternoon Session 2pm to 5pm.
• Registration url: Announcements will be made when the registration form is open for registrations.
• The online registration form has to be filled and the certification exam fee needs to be paid. More details will be made available when the exam registration form is published. If there are any changes, it will be mentioned then.
• Please check the form for more details on the cities where the exams will be held, the conditions you agree to when you fill the form etc.

CRITERIA TO GET A CERTIFICATE:
• Average assignment score = 25% of average of best 8 assignments out of the total 12 assignments given in the course.
• Exam score = 75% of the proctored certification exam score out of 100
• Final score = Average assignment score + Exam score

YOU WILL BE ELIGIBLE FOR A CERTIFICATE ONLY IF AVERAGE ASSIGNMENT SCORE >=10/25 AND EXAM SCORE >= 30/75.
• If one of the 2 criteria is not met, you will not get the certificate even if the Final score >= 40/100.
• Certificate will have your name, photograph and the score in the final exam with the breakup.It will have the logos of NPTEL and IIT Madras. It will be e-verifiable at nptel.ac.in/noc.
• Only the e-certificate will be made available. Hard copies will not be dispatched.

Stony Brook University

College of Arts and SciencesWomen’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

HomeUndergraduateCoursesWinter 2022 Courses[WST Offerings]WST 102:  Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies in the Social Sciences  – DIV, CER, SBS  ONLINE Asynchronous – Hafza GirdapONLINE Asynchronous – Francesca PetronioThis course is an introductory and interdisciplinary survey that will familiarize students with gender and sexuality theories, histories of women’s and feminist movements, and current debates within Women’s and Gender Studies. We draw on sources from across the social sciences to understand how gender and sex is explained with respect to specific physical bodies; formulates identities within gendered institutions; and influences our everyday personal and political interactions. Critically thinking of these issues can only occur when we include the intersection of racial, class, age, ableist and national identities within our analysis. The overarching theme of power, hierarchy, and privilege in structured(ing) institutions will always guide our study. WST 103: Women, Culture, Difference – CER, HUM, DIVONLINE Asynchronous – Tasmia HaqueONLINE Asynchronous – Val MoyerAn introductory humanities survey focusing on women’s traditional association with the home and men’s association with public life and how writers, artists, philosophers, and religious thinkers have reflected upon those relationships over the past 150 years. Through lectures and critical analyses of novels, poetry, art, philosophy, and religious texts, the course explores how changing intellectual, artistic, and religious precepts have affected gender identity and different genres in the humanities. WST 291: Introduction to Feminist Theory – DIV, ESI, HFA+ONLINE Asynchronous – Melis UmutAn introductory survey of historical and contemporary interdisciplinary theories used in Women’s and Gender Studies. Theoretical debates on sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, knowledge, discourse, representation are among the topics to be considered. The course will provide a strong theoretical foundation for further studies in Women’s and Gender Studies .WST 301: Histories of Feminism – SBS+, DIVONLINE Asynchronous – Jose Flores SanchezAn historical study of the theoretical and practical developments that form contemporary feminism. Beginning with the 18th century critiques of women’s rights, the course traces the expansion of feminist concerns to include a global perspective, as well as attention to race and class. Representative texts include Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Women, poems by Phyllis Wheatley and Sojourner Truth, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper, Virginia Woolf’s Three Guineas, and Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex.  [WST-Related Electives]SOC 247/WST 247: Sociology of Gender – DIV, SBSONLINE Asynchronous  -Sophia BoutilierThe historical and contemporary roles of women and men in American society; changing relations between the sexes; women’s liberation and related movements.  Themes are situated within the context of historical developments in the U.S. This course is offered as both SOC 247 and WST 247. _________________________________________________________________________________ Spring 2022 Courses[WST Offerings]WST 102:  Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies in the Social Sciences  – DIV, CER, SBS  In Person – Tu/Th 11:30-12:50pm – Cristina KhanIn Person – Tu/Th 9:45-11:05am – Hafza GirdapOnline Asynchronous – Annu DaftuarThis course is an introductory and interdisciplinary survey that will familiarize students with gender and sexuality theories, histories of women’s and feminist movements, and current debates within Women’s and Gender Studies. We draw on sources from across the social sciences to understand how gender and sex is explained with respect to specific physical bodies; formulates identities within gendered institutions; and influences our everyday personal and political interactions. Critically thinking of these issues can only occur when we include the intersection of racial, class, age, ableist and national identities within our analysis. The overarching theme of power, hierarchy, and privilege in structured(ing) institutions will always guide our study. WST 103: Women, Culture, Difference – CER, HUM, DIVONLINE Synchronous – Tu/Th 9:45-11:05am  – Ritch Calvin; Callen Zimmerman, Genie Ruzicka, Francesca Petronio, and Tasmia Haque In Person – Mon/Wed 2:40 – 4:00pm – Yesenia TorresAn introductory humanities survey focusing on women’s traditional association with the home and men’s association with public life and how writers, artists, philosophers, and religious thinkers have reflected upon those relationships over the past 150 years. Through lectures and critical analyses of novels, poetry, art, philosophy, and religious texts, the course explores how changing intellectual, artistic, and religious precepts have affected gender identity and different genres in the humanities. WST 111: Introduction to Queer Studies  – DIV, CER, HUMIn Person – Tu/Th 3:00 – 4:20pm – Jade KaiONLINE Asynchronous – Lizbeth ZunigaThis course will provide students with a broad overview of queer studies and major theorists and thinkers within the field. Beginning with Foucault before turning to more contemporary theorists, this course will be an interdisciplinary approach to American queer studies. Through the examination of visual culture, literature, and theory, students will learn to read critically through the lenses of queer theory, critical ethnic studies, disability studies, and feminist theory.  WST 210: Contemporary Issues in WGSS –  DIV, CER, SBS+In Person – Tu/Th 9:45-11:05pm – “Introduction to Mad Studies” – Ashley BarryAn introduction to the academic field of Mad Studies and the activist field of Mad Pride, drawing on critical disability studies, the psychiatric survivor movement, and critical psychiatry. Students will be able to identify key transformations in the recent history of mental health/illness; consider Madness along other dimensions of identity including gender, race, and sexuality; and compare approaches in the contemporary Consumer/Survivor/Ex-patient movement. Alongside course readings and discussions, we will also be considering cultural representations of Madness in popular narrative film. WST 210: Contemporary Issues in WGSS –  DIV, CER, SBS+ONLINE Asynchronous  – “Gendering Asian America” – Zoey ChuThis course provides an introductory survey focusing on racialized and gendered representations of people of Asian descent in the U.S. Together, we will examine the mutually embedded relations between race and gender in the contexts of Asian America and look at race and subject formation through a transnational lens. We will consider historical and contemporary configurations of identities (race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, etc.) with respect to a range of topics such as immigration and assimilation, Orientalism, American empire, globalization, and social movements. While this course focuses on race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary Asian America, we will pay special attention to Asian diasporas elsewhere. WST 291: Introduction to Feminist Theory – DIV, ESI, HFA+In Person – Tues/Thurs 1:15 – 2:35pm – Cristina KhanONLINE Asynchronous – Desi SelfONLINE Asynchronous – Galia Cozzi-BerrondoAn introductory survey of historical and contemporary interdisciplinary theories used in Women’s and Gender Studies. Theoretical debates on sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, knowledge, discourse, representation are among the topics to be considered. The course will provide a strong theoretical foundation for further studies in Women’s and Gender Studies .WST 301: Histories of Feminism – SBS+, DIVONLINE Asynchronous – Jose Flores SanchezAn historical study of the theoretical and practical developments that form contemporary feminism. Beginning with the 18th century critiques of women’s rights, the course traces the expansion of feminist concerns to include a global perspective, as well as attention to race and class. Representative texts include Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Women, poems by Phyllis Wheatley and Sojourner Truth, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper, Virginia Woolf’s Three Guineas, and Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex.   WST 305: Feminist Theories in Context – HFA+ONLINE Asynchronous  – Suzanne StaubThis course offers students an introduction to major traditions in critical and cultural theory while focusing specifically on how feminist scholars have pushed these theories in new directions. The aim of this class is not to provide a comprehensive survey of modern theoretical traditions; instead, we will examine several key theoretical terms that have become central to feminist thought during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. In addition to unpacking the ways in which liberalism and neoliberalism have shaped contemporary debates about sex, gender, and sexuality, we will also look at how feminist perspectives have challenged and complicated theories of nationalism and citizenship, labor and consumption, and representation and circulation. In doing so, we will gain insight into how feminist theories inform and are informed by other interdisciplinary fields, such as queer studies, disability studies, transgender studies, postcolonial studies, and critical race and ethnic studies. WST 372/EGL 372 – Topics in Women & Literature – “Feminism, Ecology, Climate” – HFA+In Person – Tu/Th 1:15-2:35pm – Heidi HutnerOur course will examine the intersection of gender, poverty, and race in environmental literature, culture, history, activism, media, and film. We will trace the history and role of women and other underrepresented groups as they engage in and are impacted by a variety of environmental crises. We will study the work of Rachel Carson, Wangari Maathi, Terry Tempest Williams, Octavia Butler, Sandra Steinbraber, Winona LaDuke, Vandana Shiva, Jane Goodall, Robert Bullard, and many more. Students will learn about a wide variety of environmental issues, including Climate Change, toxic pollution, nuclear waste, ecofeminism, environmental racism, water and air pollution, food rights, and animal rights. Students will create interactive presentations, write one long essay, and keep weekly blogs. WST 395: Topics in Global Feminism – “Immigration, Borders,and Identity” – DIV, GLO, SBS+In Person – Tu/Th 9:45-11:05am -Margarita EspadaDescription TBA   WST 398: Topics in Gender, Race, Ethnicity – “Immigration, Nation, and the Media” – DIV, SBS+In Person – Thursdays 1:15-4:05pm – Nancy HiemstraThis course explores how immigration and debates about immigration tie to ideas of national identity, with a focus on the role played by media coverage of immigration issues and events. We identify causes and consequences of immigration through a feminist, interdisciplinary lens, with special attention to race, gender, class, sexuality, ability, and family. We analyze restrictive laws and enforcement measures employed to maintain national borders—territorial and conceptual—historically and today. We deconstruct common narratives, metaphors, and images evident in media coverage of immigration, and examine how they shape immigration debates, immigrant/citizen interactions, and experiences of membership and belonging. Throughout the semester, we pay attention to current news and events, and explore a range of contemporary topics. While our primary focus is on the United States, we also give attention to the relationship between immigration, nation, and media around the world. Course materials include an interdisciplinary variety of academic readings, news sources, social media, and film/video. WST 399: Topics in Gender & Sexuality – “Politics of Sex in Sports” – HFA+, DIVONLINE Asynchronous -Val MoyerThis course offers an overview of current issues surrounding sex, gender, and sexuality in sports, along with historical grounding. We will look at a variety of topics in sports from an intersectional feminist lens, including media coverage of athletes, transgender athlete participation, the Paralympics and disability sports, and sports technology. In this course, we investigate the ways race, class, dis/ability, and sexuality work in concert to shape the ways sex is understood and policed in sports policy from the collegiate through professional levels.  WST 407: Senior Research Seminar for Women’s and Gender Studies  Minors – EXP+, SPK, WRTDIn Person – Tuesdays 1:15-4:05pm – Ritch CalvinAn exploration of significant feminist scholarship in various disciplines designed for students who are majoring in disciplines other than women’s and gender studies. Seminar participants present and discuss reports on reading and research. WST 408: Senior Research Seminar for Women’s and Gender Studies  Majors – EXP+, SPK, WRTDIn Person – Mondays 1:00-3:50pm – Liz MontegaryAn exploration of significant feminist scholarship in various disciplines designed for students who are majoring in disciplines other than women’s and gender studies. Seminar participants present and discuss reports on reading and research. [WST-Related Electives]AAS 232: Intro to Asian American Fiction and Film – HUM, USAIn Person – Mon/Wed 2:40-4:00pm – Maria Nerissa Balce CortesThis course is an introductory survey of Asian American fiction (short stories and novels) and films (narratives and documentaries). A central premise of the course is that the histories of racial segregation in the U.S., immigrant exclusion acts, colonial and contemporary wars in Asia, and global migrations are the political and historical contexts of Asian American narratives. AAS 372: Family, Marriage, and Kinship in China  – SBS+In Person – Mon/Wed 2:40-4:00pm – Gregory RufExamines forms and dynamics of social organizations in Chinese society, focusing on cultural, social, and economic aspects of family, marriage, and extended kinship relations such as lineages, clans, and sworn brotherhoods. Particular attention is paid to how gender, generation, class, and ritual exchange shape identity, status, and power. This course is offered as both AAS 372 and ANT 372 AAS 391: Humanities Topics in AAS: “Cultures of Filipino Disaspora” – HFA+In Person – Mon/Wed 4:25-5:45pm – Maria Nerissa Balce CortesPast topics have included titles such as Sikhism; Introduction to Indian Philosophy; Modern Indian Literature; and Appreciating Indian Music. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated as the topic changes. AFS 306: Gender and Public Health in Africa – GLO, SBS+In Person – Mon/Wed 4:25-5:45pm – Adryan WallaceExamines approaches to disease prevention and treatment through public health systems in African countries.  The impact of global health organizations such as WHO, UNAIDS and other UN bodies and international development organizations on domestic health care policy is also analyzed.  An emphasis is placed on identifying the most prominent public health issues in each of the county case studies and identifying points of convergence and divergence among them.  More specifically their relationships to gender equality, education, and economic security and population displacement will be evaluated using Intersectionality as a theoretical framework.  Disparities in access to health insurance, treatment, and medication, and funding mechanisms will be analyzed.  ANP 403: Seminar in Biological Anthropology: “Biology of Inequity”In Person – Mon/Wed 2:40-4:00pm – Marcy Ekanayake Weber

Here are some questions the course will address:

Why do racial minorities and the poor have high rates of chronic disease?
How does access to one resource early in life affect your long-term health?
Does childbearing present a “natural” biological disadvantage for ciswomen?
What is violence? Who has permission to use violence in society?
How has colonialism reshaped biological realities in the past 500 years?

Students may contact the course instructor,  Marcy Weber for more information.  Students who wish to register will need to complete the  Permission Request FormCCS 311: Gender and Genre in Film: “The Problem with Disney” – DIV, HFA+In Person – Tu/Th 9:45-10:40am & LAB ONLINE – Sophie LeroyExamination of the notion of genre as a category of analysis and its often conflictive relationship to gender in the context of specific genres (the western, film noir, the horror film) and film story. Attention is paid to a particular genre’s appeal to men and/or women as well as its relationship to larger social, cultural, and political issues. May be repeated as the topic changes. EGL 372/WST 372: Topics in Women and Literature: “Feminism, Ecology, Climate” – HFA+In Person – Tu/Th 1:15-2:35pm  – Heidi HutnerThis course will examine the intersection of gender, poverty, and race in environmental literature, culture, history, activism, media, and film.  We will trace the history and role of women and other underrepresented groups as they engage in and are impacted by a variety of environmental crises. We will study the work of Rachel Carson, Wangari Maathi, Terry Tempest Williams, Octavia Butler, Sandra Steinbraber, Winona LaDuke, Vandana Shiva, Jane Goodall, Robert Bullard, and many more. Students will learn about a wide variety of environmental issues, including Climate Change, toxic pollution, nuclear waste, ecofeminism, environmental racism, water and air pollution, food rights, and animal rights. Students will create interactive presentations, write one long essay, and keep weekly blogs. HIS 327: The Arts as History – HFA+, SBS+In Person – Tu/Th 9:45-11:05am  – April Masten Ex amines 19th-century America through the visual, literary, and performance arts.  The significance of every work of art lies in the immediate conditions of its production and reception, in who created or practiced it, how people learned to do it, the skills it encompassed, how it became an employment, where it was exhibited or performed, and who marketed, bought, or enjoyed it.  In this class, 19th-century drawings, paintings, sculptures; essays, novels, poems; music, dance, and theater are studied as primary documents, physical embodiments of their historical moment. HIS 334/WST360: Women and Gender in Pre-Modern European History – SBS+In Person – Tu/Th 11:30-12:50pm  – Sara LiptonAn examination of the position of women in European society from ancient Greece through the Italian Renaissance. The course examines women’s roles in the family and political life; women’s economic activities; women and the Christian church; cultural attitudes concerning women; and women’s own writing and creativity. This course is offered as both HIS 334 and WST 360. Formerly offered as HIS 360. HUS 221: Disabled Bodies, National Politics – DIV, STASIn Person – Mon/Fri 1:00 – 2:20pm  – Aurelie VialetteA study of the disabled body in nineteenth century Iberian cultural production. An inquiry into who was considered disabled and what were the consequences of being discriminated as such. We will focus on physical, social and economic differences in order to understand them. We will study human and cultural differences and will discuss issues of gender, race, varying abilities and disabilities, socioeconomic level, sexual orientation. We will also focus on medicine and science, as medicine discourse and treatises have established what a disability is and turned disability into a social construct.  POL 330/WST 330: Gender Issues in the Law – DIV, SBS+In Person -Mondays 6:05-0:00pm  – Juliette PasserA critical exploration of American law that specifically addresses the issues of (in)equality of women and men in the United States. The course surveys and analyzes cases from the pre-Civil War era to the end of the 20th century dealing with various manifestations of sex discrimination, decided in the federal court system, typically by the Supreme Court, and the state court system. The course also considers how the political nature of the adjudicative process has ramifications for the decisions rendered by a court.  This course is offered as both POL 330 and WST 330. PSY 342: Psychology of Women’s Health – DIVIn Person -Tu/Th 6:30-7:50pm  – Marci LobelAn investigation of psychological aspects of women’s health and gender differences in health through readings, lectures, films, guest speakers and presentations, class discussions, a writing assignment, and other educational activities. SOC 247/WST 247: Sociology of Gender – DIV, SBSIn Person -Tu/Th 11:30-12:50pm  – Rachelle GermanaThe historical and contemporary roles of women and men in American society; changing relations between the sexes; women’s liberation and related movements.  Themes are situated within the context of historical developments in the U.S. This course is offered as both SOC 247 and WST 247. SOC 340/WST 340: Sociology of Gender – STASONLINE – Wednesdays 6:05-8:55pm  – Cathy MarroneA study of the links between biological reproduction and the socioeconomic and cultural processes that affect and are affected by it. The history of the transition from high levels of fertility and mortality to low levels of both; different kinship, gender, and family systems around the world and their links to human reproduction; the value of children in different social contexts; and the social implications of new reproductive technologies. This course is offered as both SOC 340 and  WST 340

About the author

Study on Scholarship Today -- Check your eligibility for up to 100% scholarship.