bachelor’s degree in botany requirements

Last Updated on December 14, 2022

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Have you always been concerned about getting information on the Bachelor’s Degree In Botany Requirements? This very post will do justice to all of your questions. As you read on, you will get to find out information about; Bachelor’s Degree In Botany Requirements, botany bachelors degree online, what is a botanist, botany careers and other related information

botany bachelors degree online

Best Online Degrees in Botany

Explore a Bachelor’s Degree in Botany

Students who pursue an undergraduate degree in botany will study plants, how they survive, and how they interact with other living and non-living things in the environment. Students who are passionate about the living world will learn about the diversity of its living organisms, including algae, fungi, and bacteria. After completing a bachelor’s degree in botany, individuals can pursue careers in environmental studies, conservation, biotechnology, agriculture, horticulture, and more. Some students may also opt to pursue further education, which may eventually lead to careers in academia. Botany programs generally require students to complete 80-100 credit hours, but actual requirements will vary based on the individual program.

Class Curriculum

To receive a bachelor’s degree in botany, students will take a number of classes related to the biological sciences. The typical curriculum includes classes in chemistry, physics, biology, statistics, and calculus. More specifically, students may take classes in plant taxonomy, plant anatomy, plant physiology, cryptogamic botany, and genetics within a botany program.

  • Plant Biotechnology. This course will explain the processes involved in plant biotechnology, such as plant tissue culture, protoplast technology, DNA isolation, PCR gene cloning, sequencing DNA, and hybridizations. The course may also encourage students to consider the ethics and value of biotechnology, including the political issues related to genetically modified organisms (GMOs).
  • Ecology. Students will study the interactions among organisms and the environment at large. This course examines the composition, structure, and dynamics of communities, ecosystems, landscapes, and the biosphere.
  • Ethnobotany. Ethnobotany is the study of the interaction between people and plants. Students will study how plants are used, managed, and perceived across various cultures. They will examine the purposes plants serve as food, clothing, medicine, cosmetics, and more within human societies. This course will cover also topics such as phytochemistry, archaeobotany, and folk taxonomy.

Students enrolled in an undergraduate botany program will complete lab work, projects, and examinations. Some programs also require students in their final year to complete an independent research project, known as a senior thesis or senior composition. Individuals should consult their respective schools for specific program requirements.

Building a Career

After graduating from an undergraduate botany program, individuals can pursue teaching opportunities at secondary schools and some colleges; teaching at the university level will require a master’s degree or a Ph.D. Other graduates may opt to pursue research opportunities or to work for private and governmental organizations in the environmental sector; those with a bachelor’s degree can obtain basic research positions. A significant percentage of botany students do go on to work for the federal government, as it is the largest employer for biological scientists. However, many of these opportunities may require advanced level degrees.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) classifies botanists in three separate categories: “biochemists and biophysicists,” “microbiologists,” and “zoologists and wildlife biologists.” Naturally, salaries will vary based on the field botany majors pursue. The median annual wage of biochemists and biophysicists was $79,390; microbiologists made $65,920, and zoologists and wildlife biologists made $57,430. However, individuals should note that actual salaries are dependent on a number of factors; location can determine earnings, as well as an individual’s level of experience.

Bachelor’s Degree In Botany Requirements

OVERVIEW OF DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Minimum number of credits required to graduate: 120

Minimum Cumulative GPA required to graduate: 2.0

Minimum Grade requirements for courses to count toward major: A C or higher is required in BIO 100 and BIO 200.

Other GPA requirements to graduate: A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in all courses in Biological Sciences Areas, affiliated science, and math courses combined.

Required Course(s) for fulfilling Capstone Experience: BIO 388 or BIO 392 or BIO 402 or BIO 428 or BIO 431 or BIO 438 or BIO 450 or BIO 463 or HON 498 and HON 499* or both BIO 480 and 483. For specific requirements see the curricula for individual concentrations.

*The thesis topic must be in Botany and the thesis advisor should be in the School of Biology and Ecology.

Contact Information: Ann Dieffenbacher-Krall, Undergraduate Coordinator, 100 Murray Hall, (207)581-2540, [email protected]

Plants are of critical importance to the world and in human society. They are sources of useful materials, such as human and animal foods, fibers, building materials, medicines, and horticultural specimens. They are major primary produces, the foundation of terrestrial ecosystems, and an essential matrix for other organisms in forests, savannas, marshes, and many other habitats. Tremendous advances in biotechnology, environmental studies, and related areas make botany an important and fascinating field of study. Graduates of our Botany program pursue various careers, depending on their interest, level of educational attainment, and subsequent professional education. Among the more typical career areas are environmental monitoring and regulation at state and federal levels, scientific research and development, education at the high-school and college levels, and private design and consulting.

Botany offers students many choices and allows them to tailor their programs to their interests. Students can choose from a wide range of courses covering all major areas of biology including cells and molecules, genetics, evolution, physiology, anatomy, evolution and biodiversity, and ecology. Students enrolled in the Honors College will find the program complementary to their degree studies. Each student works with an academic advisor to develop a curriculum that best meets the student’s goals and allows for exploration or specialization as desired. Students in their third and fourth years of study, who intend to pursue post-baccalaureate studies leading to advanced degrees, are strongly encouraged to include independent research under the guidance of a faculty member in their programs. Students wishing to spend a semester studying abroad are advised to discuss this option with their advisor early in their program.

The B.S. and B.A. degrees in Botany is offered by the School of Biology and Ecology. For information about areas of research and for an overview of our facilities, cooperative programs, and list of faculty in the School of Biology and Ecology, see our web site www.sbe.umaine.edu/

Students choosing Botany as a second major are not required to complete a Botany capstone provided the student completes a capstone for their first major.

Students majoring in Botany are not eligible for a minor or second major in Biology or Zoology because of extensive overlap in the requirements for these degrees.

Students majoring in Botany must complete an assessment exit exam in their last semester prior to graduating.

Students majoring in Botany must earn a score of 4 or 5 in order to receive advanced placement credit for BIO 100.

Students must complete a minimum of 12 credits originating from the University of Maine in Biological Sciences Areas I-V.

Students wishing to transfer from other institutions or from another program within the University of Maine must have completed BIO 100: Basic Biology with a grade of C or better, have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better, and a grade of C or better in MAT 111 or no grade record in MAT 111 and a score 30 or higher on the Math Placement Exam.

Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts

The School of Biology and Ecology offers both B.S. and B.A. degrees in Botany. Both degrees provide a strong background in biological sciences. They have the same requirements in biological sciences and differ only in the level of chemistry, mathematics, physics, and social sciences required. The B.S. requires more in-depth study of chemistry, math, and physics while the B.A. requires more social sciences and humanities. The B.S. provides preparation for laboratory or field scientists while the B.A. ensures a broad liberal arts education and allows more flexibility for minors and double majors.

Expertise in Botany is essential to insure that sound science is the foundation for public policy, laws, regulations, business decisions, natural resource management, and communication about scientific ideas and issues. Educators, artists, writers, lawyers, economists, public policy makers and politicians, and business people in green industries, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and agribusiness greatly benefit from a strong background in science. Pairing a BA with a second major or minor builds strength for careers in education, communication, policy, law, or business. In addition, the critical thinking, reading, and writing skills gained through humanities and social sciences courses can significantly contribute to a career in science.

BA students are required to declare a minor or 2nd major in an approved subject outside of botany or biology or zoology, or complete additional General Education requirements as noted below. BA students are encouraged to explore career options through the University of Maine Career Center and with their academic advisor to select a minor or 2nd major that adds breadth to the academic program by developing skills and knowledge outside of the primary major.

Concentration in the B.S and B.A. Degree in Botany

The Ecology Concentration is open to students in either the B.S. or B.A. degree program. This concentration is intended for students interested in exposure to ecological principles within the context of a rigorous biological sciences curriculum.

Biology Club

Students majoring in Biology, Botany, Zoology, and Medical Laboratory Sciences (Medical Technology) are encouraged to join the Biology Club, a student organization that promotes an interest in the biological sciences and in biological research with invited speakers, panel discussions, debates, trips, social functions, and service projects. The club also supports a local chapter of the national honor society, Beta Beta Beta.

Combined B.S. and M.S. degrees in Botany, Entomology, or Zoology

“Double Up” programs allow highly dedicated students to earn both the B.S. and the M.S. degrees in five to six years. This allows the student to save time and reduces the cost of the M.S. degree. See our web site for details, https://sbe.umaine.edu/, or the Graduate School webpage, https://umaine.edu/graduate/.

Bachelor of Science Core Requirements

  1. Basic Biology:

BIO 100 and BIO 200 (Minimum grade of C required in each.)

  1. General Chemistry:

CHY 121, CHY 122, CHY 123, and CHY 124

  1. Organic Chemistry I:

CHY 251 and CHY 253; or BMB 221 and BMB 222

  1. Organic Chemistry II or Biochemistry:

CHY 252 and CHY 254; or BMB 322 and BMB 323

  1. Physics I:

PHY 111 or PHY 121

  1. Physics II:

PHY 112 or PHY 122

  1. Calculus:

MAT 116 or MAT 126 or MAT 136

  1. Statistics:

STS 232 or WLE 220 or PSY 241

  1. Biological Sciences Area Credits (see below): minimum of 24 credits including 3 credits each from areas I, III, IV, and V, and 6 credits from area II. At least four lab courses (L) must be taken among the BIO Area courses, and at least three plant courses (P). A minimum of 12 of these credits must be taken at University of Maine
  2. Required Course:

NFA 117

  1. Satisfy general education requirements: To fill the general education capstone requirement, Biology B.S. students must take one of the following:

BIO 388, BIO 392, BIO 402, BIO 428, BIO 431, BIO 438, BIO 450, BIO 463, HON 499, or both BIO 480 and BIO 483.

  1. Minimum average GPA 2.0 is required for all courses listed in items 1-9 above and capstone.

Bachelor of Arts Core Requirements

  1. Basic Biology:

BIO 100 and BIO 200 (Minimum grade of C required in each.)

  1. General Chemistry:

CHY 121, CHY 122, CHY 123, and CHY 124

  1. Organic Chemistry:

BMB 221 and BMB 222; or CHY 251 and CHY 253

  1. Physics:

PHY 105, PHY 111 or PHY 121

  1. Mathematics:

MAT 116 or MAT 126 or MAT 136 or STS 232 or WLE 220 or PSY 241

  1. Biological Sciences Area Credits (see below): minimum of 24 credits including 3 credits each from areas I, III, IV, and V, and 6 credits from area II. At least four lab courses (L) must be taken among the BIO Area courses, and at least three plant courses (P). A minimum of 12 of these credits must be taken at University of Maine.
  2. Required Course:

NFA 117

  1. Minimum average GPA 2.0 is required for all courses listed in items 1-6 above and the capstone.
  2. Satisfy General Education requirements. Be aware that a total of 6 credits are required in Quantitative Analysis. To fill the general education capstone requirement, Biology B.A. students must take one of:

BIO 388, BIO 392, BIO 402, BIO 428, BIO 431, BIO 438, BIO 450, BIO 463, HON 499, or both BIO 480 and BIO 483.

  1. International Perspectives or a Minor or Second Major:

a1. Students must complete an academic minor or a second academic major outside of their primary discipline. The following minors or second majors fill this requirement. Other minors or majors may be acceptable with prior approval of the Undergraduate Program Coordinator. Minors: Accounting, Anthropology, Archaeology, Business Administration, Child Development and Family Relations, Climate Studies, Computer Science, The Constitution and American Law, Creative Writing, Economics, Education, English, Environmental Ethics, Ethics and Political Philosophy, French, History, Graphic Design, International Affairs, Journalism, Leadership Studies, Legal Studies, Management, Marketing, Marxist and Socialist Studies, Mathematics, Media Studies, New Media, Peace and Reconciliation Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Political Theory, Professional Writing, Renewable Energy Science and Technology, Resources and Agribusiness Management, Sociology, Spanish, Statistics, Studio Art, Theatre. Second Majors: Computer Science, Mathematics, Secondary Education, Studio Art.

OR

a2. Alternatively, a student may complete, within their program of study, 27 credits in courses meeting the human values and social context general education criteria of the university. At least 12 credits of these must be at the 200 level or above. Student must satisfy International Perspectives by either 1) Establishing intermediate level proficiency in a foreign language, or 2) at least one semester in a UMaine approved foreign exchange program, or 3) 9 credits in Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives, which may overlap with the 27 human values and social context credits noted above.

AND

b. Students must complete a minimum of 60 credits outside their major. (If a particular major requires courses in another discipline, either within the same department or in another department, those credits may still count toward the 60 credits.) Depending on the particular program, the degree will require from 120 or 121 total credits for graduation. In addition, each student must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.0 over all courses taken. Some programs may also require minimum grade point averages for courses within the major. Students should consult individual program sections about specific details concerning a particular major.

Ecology Concentration Requirements

  1. Satisfy the core requirements of either the B.S. or B.A. degree program.
  2. Statistics requirement: Take the following course to satisfy the requirement:

WLE 220 Note for B.A. students, WLE 220 requires either MAT 116, MAT 122, or MAT 126 as a prerequisite.

  1. For BIO Area V: Take the following courses:

BIO 319 or SMS 300 and at least 3 additional credits chosen from BIO 205, BIO 309, BIO 327, BIO 354, BIO 411, BIO 431, BIO 434, BIO 455, BIO 463, BIO 468, BIO 476, EES 475, PSE 457, PSE 469, SFR 457, SMS 308, WLE 200, or WLE 423.

  1. Primary and Secondary Producers: Choose at least one animal course, labeled A, from the BIO Areas.
  2. Environmental Influences: At least one of the following courses:

EES 140, ERS 101, ERS 102, ERS 108, or SFR 406

  1. Field Experience: At least one of the following courses:

BIO 205, BIO 309 , BIO 430, BIO 437, BIO 463, EES 475, or WLE 423. This course can also satisfy one of the BIO areas for the basic Botany major.

  1. General Education requirement: To fill the general education capstone requirement, students in the Ecology Concentration must take one of the following:

BIO 388, BIO 392, BIO 431, BIO 463 or HON 499.

  1. Writing Intensive: ENG 315 or ENG 317

Biological Sciences Areas for the B.S. or B.A.
If BIO 431, BIO 438, BIO 450, or BIO 463 is taken as a capstone, it can go toward satisfying the area in which it is listed and can count as a laboratory course (if labeled L), but cannot count towards the 24 credits required in Areas I-V. BIO 480 can count as a capstone if, and only if, BIO 483 is also taken. In this case, BIO 480 can go toward satisfying one of the BIO areas, but the credits do not count towards the 24 BIO area credits; the two credits from BIO 483 can be counted toward the 24 BIO area credits.

I. Cell and Molecular Biology
Students must take BMB 280 or BIO 480 or 6 total credits from the area.

BIO 336 – Developmental Biology Credits: 4
BIO 438 – Morphogenesis in Development and Disease Credits: 3
BIO 450 – Histology Credits: 4
BIO 474 – Neurobiology Credits: 3
BIO 480 – Cell Biology Credits: 3
BIO 483 – Cell Biology Laboratory Credits: 2
BMB 280 – Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology Credits: 3
BMB 300 – General Microbiology Credits: 3
BMB 305 – General Microbiology Laboratory Credits: 2
BMB 420 – Infectious Disease Credits: 3
BMB 421 – Infectious Disease Laboratory Credits: 2
L – BIO 336, BIO 450, BIO 483, BMB 305, BMB 421
II. Genetics and Evolution
Both courses are required.

BIO 350 – Concepts and Applications of Genetics Credits: 3
BIO 365 – Fundamentals of Evolution Credits: 3
III. Physiology
BIO 307 – Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Credits: 3
BIO 311 – Animal Ecophysiology Credits: 3
BIO 377 – Medical Physiology Credits: 3
BIO 378 – Medical Physiology Laboratory Credits: 2
BIO 452 – Plant Physiology Credits: 3
BIO 453 – Plant Physiology Laboratory Credits: 1
BIO 479 – Endocrinology Credits: 3
BIO 480 – Cell Biology Credits: 3
BIO 483 – Cell Biology Laboratory Credits: 2
BMB 430 – Bacterial Physiology Credits: 3
BMB 431 – Bacterial Physiology Laboratory Credits: 1
BMB 440 – Introductory Immunology Credits: 3
BMB 441 – Introductory Immunology Laboratory Credits: 1
L – BIO 378, BIO 453, BIO 483, BMB 431, BMB 441
A – BIO 307, BIO 311, BIO 377, BIO 479, BMB 440
P – BIO 452
IV. Biodiversity
BIO 310 – Plant Biology Credits: 4
BIO 326 – General Entomology Credits: 4
BIO 329 – Vertebrate Biology Credits: 3
BIO 331 – Vertebrate Biology Laboratory Credits: 1
BIO 335 – Human Anatomy Credits: 4
BIO 342 – Plants in Our World Credits: 3
BIO 353 – Invertebrate Zoology Credits: 4
BIO 430 – Ecology and Systematics of Aquatic Insects Credits: 4
BIO 432 – Biology of the Fungi Credits: 4
BIO 433 – Mammalogy Credits: 4
BIO 464 – Taxonomy of Vascular Plants Credits: 4
SFR 439 – Biology of Woody Plants Credits: 3
SMS 373 – Marine and Freshwater Algae Credits: 4
L- BIO 310, BIO 326, BIO 331, BIO 335, BIO 353, BIO 430, BIO 432, BIO 433, BIO 464, SFR 439, SMS 373
A – BIO 326, BIO 329, BIO 335, BIO 353, BIO 430, BIO 433
P – BIO 310, BIO 342, BIO 432, BIO 464, SFR 439, SMS 373
V. Ecology and Behavior
Students must take BIO 319 or SMS 300 or 6 credits from the area.

BIO 205 – Field Natural History of Maine Credits: 4
BIO 309 – Sustainability and Conservation Travel Study Credits: 3
BIO 319 – General Ecology Credits: 3
BIO 354 – Animal Behavior Credits: 3
BIO 411 – Insect Ecology Credits: 3
BIO 431 – Emerging Infectious Diseases Credits: 4
BIO 434 – Avian Biology and Ecology Credits: 3
BIO 437 – Avian Biology and Ecology Laboratory Credits: 1
BIO 455 – Biological Invasions Credits: 3
BIO 463 – River Ecology Credits: 4
BIO 468 – Lake Ecology Credits: 3
BIO 476 – Paleoecology Credits: 4
EES 140 – Soil Science Credits: 3
EES 141 – Soil Science Laboratory Credits: 1
EES 475 – Field Studies in Ecology Credits: 1-3
PSE 457 – Plant Pathology Credits: 4
SMS 300 – Marine Ecology Credits: 3
SMS 308 – Conservation and Ecology of Marine Mammals Credits: 3
WLE 200 – Ecology Credits: 3
WLE 201 – Ecology Laboratory Credits: 3
WLE 423 – Wetland Ecology and Conservation Credits: 4
L – BIO 205, BIO 309, BIO 431, BIO 437, BIO 463, BIO 476, EES 141, EES 475, PSE 457, WLE 201, WLE 423
A – BIO 354, BIO 411, BIO 434, SMS 308
P – PSE 457
Alternate Area
Courses within the Alternate Area can be included in the 24 total area minimum credits, but do not count toward any specific area except by prior arrangement with the program coordinator. A total of three credits from BIO 387 or BIO 391 can be counted toward the 24 credit total.

BIO 387 – Undergraduate Research in Biology Credits: 1-6
BIO 391 – Undergraduate Independent Study in Biology Credits: 1-6
BIO 428 – Issues in Plant Genetic Engineering Credits: 3
BMB 155 – Genome Discovery II: From DNA to Genes Credits: 3
or

HON 155 – Genome Discovery II: From DNA to Genes Credits: 3
BMB 400 – Molecular Genetics Credits: 3
BMB 402 – Introduction to Bioinformatics Credits: 3
BMB 490 – Microbial Genetics Credits: 5
L – BMB/HON 155, BMB 490
P – BIO 428
Required Courses in Suggested Sequence for the B.S. in Botany
First Year – First Semester
BIO 100 – Basic Biology Credits: 4
CHY 121 – General Chemistry I Credits: 3
(Enrollment in CHY 121 requires readiness for MAT116 or higher math course. Students who are not sufficiently proficient in mathematics may take CHY 121 -124 in their second year, and put more focus on mathematics and General Education courses in their first year to complete their degree requirements within four years.)

CHY 123 – General Chemistry Laboratory I Credits: 1
General Education Requirement Credits: 3
MAT 116 – Introduction to Calculus Credits: 3
or

MAT 126 – Calculus I Credits: 4
NFA 117 – Issues and Opportunities Credits: 1
First Year – Second Semester
BIO 200 – Biology of Organisms Credits: 4
CHY 122 – General Chemistry II Credits: 3
CHY 124 – General Chemistry Laboratory II Credits: 1
ENG 101 – College Composition Credits: 3
General Education Requirements Credits: 3
or

BIO Area Credits: 3 (e.g.,BMB 280 or BIO 365)
Elective Credit: 1
Second Year – First Semester
BIO 350 – Concepts and Applications of Genetics Credits: 3
Either

CHY 251 – Organic Chemistry I Credits: 3
with

CHY 253 – Organic Chemistry Laboratory I Credits: 2
or

BMB 221 – Organic Chemistry Credits: 3
with

BMB 222 – Laboratory in Organic Chemistry Credits: 1
STS 232 – Principles of Statistical Inference Credits: 3
BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g., area IV with lab, plant or animal)
Second Year – Second Semester
BIO 365 – Fundamentals of Evolution Credits: 3
Either

CHY 252 – Organic Chemistry II Credits: 3
with

CHY 254 – Organic Chemistry Laboratory II Credits: 2
or

BMB 322 – Biochemistry Credits: 3
with

BMB 323 – Biochemistry Laboratory Credits: 2
BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g., BIO 310)
General Education Requirements Credits: 3
Third Year – First Semester
PHY 111 – General Physics I Credits: 4
or

PHY 121 – Physics for Engineers and Physical Scientists I Credits: 4
BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g. BIO 452 and BIO 453, Area III, plant, lab)
General Education Requirement – Writing Intensive Credits: 3
General Education Requirement Credits: 3
Elective Credits: 2
Third Year – Second Semester
PHY 112 – General Physics II Credits: 4
or

PHY 122 – Physics for Engineers and Physical Scientists II Credits: 4
BIO Area Credits: 3 (e.g., BIO 319)
BIO Area Credits: 3 (e.g., BMB 280 or other Area I)
General Education Requirement or Elective Credits: 5
Fourth Year – First Semester
Capstone or BIO Area Credit: 3
General Education Requirements or Electives Credits: 12
Fourth Year – Second Semester
BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g., area I, if not previously filled, with lab)
Capstone or BIO Area Credit: 3
General Education Requirements or Electives Credits: 8
Required Courses in Suggested Sequence for the B.S. in Botany with Ecology Concentration
First Year – First Semester
BIO 100 – Basic Biology Credits: 4
CHY 121 – General Chemistry I Credits: 3
CHY 122 – General Chemistry II Credits: 3
(Enrollment in CHY 121 requires readiness for MAT116 or higher math course. Students who are not sufficiently proficient in mathematics may take CHY 121 -124 in their second year, and put more focus on mathematics and General Education courses in their first year to complete their degree requirements within four years.)

General Education Requirement Credits: 3
MAT 116 – Introduction to Calculus Credits: 3
or

MAT 126 – Calculus I Credits: 4
NFA 117 – Issues and Opportunities Credits: 1
General Education Requirement Credits: 3
First Year – Second Semester
BIO 200 – Biology of Organisms Credits: 4
CHY 122 – General Chemistry II Credits: 3
CHY 124 – General Chemistry Laboratory II Credits: 1
ENG 101 – College Composition Credits: 3
BIO Area Credits: 3 (e.g., BMB 280)
Elective Credit: 1
Second Year – First Semester
BIO 350 – Concepts and Applications of Genetics Credits: 3
Either

CHY 251 – Organic Chemistry I Credits: 3
with

CHY 253 – Organic Chemistry Laboratory I Credits: 2
or

BMB 221 – Organic Chemistry Credits: 3
with

BMB 222 – Laboratory in Organic Chemistry Credits: 1
BIO 205 – Field Natural History of Maine Credits: 4
or other field experience Area Credits: 4

General Education Requirement Credits: 3
Second Year – Second Semester
BIO 365 – Fundamentals of Evolution Credits: 3
Either

CHY 252 – Organic Chemistry II Credits: 3
with

CHY 254 – Organic Chemistry Laboratory II Credits: 2
or

BMB 322 – Biochemistry Credits: 3
with

BMB 323 – Biochemistry Laboratory Credits: 2
BIO 319 – General Ecology Credits: 3
(or other BIO Area credits with SMS 300 taken in fall semester)

Elective Credits: 1
General Education Requirements Credits: 3
Third Year – First Semester
ENG 315 – Research Writing in the Disciplines Credits: 3
or

ENG 317 – Business and Technical Writing Credits: 3

PHY 111 – General Physics I Credits: 4
or

PHY 121 – Physics for Engineers and Physical Scientists I Credits: 4
BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g., BIO 452 and BIO 453, area III, plant, lab)
General Education Requirement Credits: 3
Elective Credits: 1
Third Year – Second Semester
PHY 112 – General Physics II Credits: 4
or

PHY 122 – Physics for Engineers and Physical Scientists II Credits: 4
WLE 220 – Introduction to Ecological Statistics Credits: 4
BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g., area IV or V, plant)
General Education Requirement Credits: 3
Fourth Year – First Semester
BIO 464 – Taxonomy of Vascular Plants Credits: 4
or other BIO area plant course

Capstone or BIO Area Credit: 3
General Education Requirements or Electives Credits: 8
Fourth Year – Second Semester
Capstone or BIO Area Credits: 3
Environmental Influences Credits: 3
General Education Requirements or Electives Credits: 9
Required Courses in Suggested Sequence for the B.A. in Botany
First Year – First Semester
BIO 100 – Basic Biology Credits: 4
CHY 121 – General Chemistry I Credits: 3
CHY 123 – General Chemistry Laboratory I Credits: 1
(Enrollment in CHY 121 requires readiness for MAT116 or higher math course. Students who are not sufficiently proficient in mathematics may take CHY 121 -124 in their second year, and put more focus on mathematics and General Education courses in their first year to complete their degree requirements within four years.)

General Education Requirement or course for minor Credits: 3
MAT 116 – Introduction to Calculus Credits: 3
or

MAT 126 – Calculus I Credits: 4
(Not required if STS 232 is taken.)

or General Education – Quantitative Literacy

NFA 117 – Issues and Opportunities Credits: 1
First Year – Second Semester
BIO 200 – Biology of Organisms Credits: 4
CHY 122 – General Chemistry II Credits: 3
CHY 124 – General Chemistry Laboratory II Credits: 1
ENG 101 – College Composition Credits: 3
General Education Requirement or course for minor Credits: 3
Elective Credit: 1
Second Year – First Semester
BIO 350 – Concepts and Applications of Genetics Credits: 3
BMB 221 – Organic Chemistry Credits: 3
BMB 222 – Laboratory in Organic Chemistry Credits: 1
BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g., BIO 464 or other area IV with lab, plant)
General Education Requirement or course for minor Credits: 3
Elective Credit: 1
Second Year – Second Semester
BIO 365 – Fundamentals of Evolution Credits: 3
STS 232 – Principles of Statistical Inference Credits: 3
(Not required if MAT 116 or MAT 126 is taken.)

Or General Education – Quantitative Literacy

BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g., BIO 310, or other course with lab, plant)
General Education Requirement or course toward minor Credits: 6
Third Year – First Semester
BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g., BIO 452 and BIO 453 or area III with lab, plant)
General Education Requirement or course toward minor Credits: 9
Elective Credits: 2
Third Year – Second Semester
BMB 280 – Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology Credits: 3
or other BIO Area I Credits: 3

PHY 105 – Descriptive Physics Credits: 4
BIO Area Credits: 3 (e.g., BIO 319 or SMS 300 taken in fall semester, area V)
General Education Requirement or course toward minor Credits: 3
Elective Credit: 2
Fourth Year – First Semester
Capstone or elective Credits: 3 (Acceptable fall semester capstone courses include BIO 388, BIO 392, BIO 402, BIO 463, or HON 499.)
General Education Requirements – Writing Intensive Credits: 3
General Education Requirements or courses toward minor Credits: 9
Fourth Year – Second Semester
BIO Area Credits with lab: 4
Capstone or elective Credits: 3 (Acceptable spring capstone courses include BIO 388, BIO 392, BIO 428, BIO 431, BIO 438, BIO 450, BIO 480 & 483, or HON 499.)
General Education Requirements or courses toward minor or Electives Credits: 8
Required Courses in Suggested Sequence for the B.A. in Botany with Ecology Concentration
First Year – First Semester
BIO 100 – Basic Biology Credits: 4
CHY 121 – General Chemistry I Credits: 3
CHY 123 – General Chemistry Laboratory I Credits: 1
(Enrollment in CHY 121 requires readiness for MAT116 or higher math course. Students who are not sufficiently proficient in mathematics may take CHY 121 -124 in their second year, and put more focus on mathematics and General Education courses in their first year to complete their degree requirements within four years.)

General Education Requirement or course for minor Credits: 3
MAT 116 – Introduction to Calculus Credits: 3
or

MAT 122 – Pre-Calculus Credits: 4
or

MAT 126 – Calculus I Credits: 4
NFA 117 – Issues and Opportunities Credits: 1
First Year – Second Semester
BIO 200 – Biology of Organisms Credits: 4
CHY 122 – General Chemistry II Credits: 3
CHY 124 – General Chemistry Laboratory II Credits: 1
ENG 101 – College Composition Credits: 3
BIO Area credits (e.g., BMB 280, BIO 365)
Elective Credit: 1
Second Year – First Semester
BIO 205 – Field Natural History of Maine Credits: 4
or other Field Experience Area Credits: 4

BIO 350 – Concepts and Applications of Genetics Credits: 3
BMB 221 – Organic Chemistry Credits: 3
BMB 222 – Laboratory in Organic Chemistry Credits: 1
General Education Requirement or course toward minor Credits: 3
Elective Credit: 1
Second Year – Second Semester
BIO 365 – Fundamentals of Evolution Credits: 3
BIO Area Credits: 3 (e.g., BIO 319 or SMS 300 taken in fall)
General Education Requirement or courses toward minor Credits: 9
Third Year – First Semester
ENG 315 – Research Writing in the Disciplines Credits: 3
or

ENG 317 – Business and Technical Writing Credits: 3
BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g., BIO 452 and BIO 453 or area III with lab, plant)
General Education Requirement or courses toward minor Credits: 9
Elective Credits: 2
Third Year – Second Semester
PHY 105 – Descriptive Physics Credits: 4
WLE 220 – Introduction to Ecological Statistics Credits: 4
BIO Area Credits: 4 (e.g., area IV or V with lab, animal)
General Education Requirement or course toward minor Credits: 3
Fourth Year – First Semester
BIO 464 – Taxonomy of Vascular Plants Credits: 4
or other BIO Area Credits

Capstone or BIO Area Credit: 3 (Acceptable capstone courses in fall semester include BIO 388, BIO 392, BIO 463, or HON 499.)
General Education Requirement or courses toward minor Credits: 6
Elective Credits: 2
Fourth Year – Second Semester
Capstone or BIO Area Credits: 3 (Acceptable capstone courses in spring semester include BIO 388 or BIO 392 or BIO 431 or HON 499.)
Environmental Influences Credits: 3
General Education Requirements or courses towards minor or Electives Credits: 8

what is a botanist

What is a Botanist? - WorldAtlas

Botanist

What does a botanist do?

What Does a Botanist Do? | Wonderopolis

Botanists study the biology of plants, fungi and other organisms, such as lichens and algae. Through the study of plants, botanists can record the impacts of human activity on the environment; the way plants breed and grow, as well as the structure and genetic make-up of various species. This knowledge can be used to develop and promote environmental protection programs, improve plant growing techniques and identify and extract plant products used in medicines, food, fabrics and other products. Some botanists may also search for and classify new plant species

Why does a botanist do this?

Botanist vs. Horticulturist: What's the Difference Between Them?

The increasing human population is linked to environmental problems of gigantic proportion. This increase creates the need for more food – and producing more food has an significant environmental impact. We can only predict global climate changes through understanding how humans affect the environment. Botanists study these changes and their effect on natural ecosystems and crop production, which are crucial to the sustainability of our future. Botanists can also use their knowledge to advise policy makers on legislation for environmental protection and on ways to save priceless natural areas.

How does a botanist do their job?

Botanists use a variety of equipment depending on whether they are working in the field or in a laboratory. When in the field they may use secateurs, trowels or other hand tools to collect plant samples. Cameras may also be used to document plant species when it is not ideal to collect a physical sample of rare species. In the laboratory, they use microscopes and various staining techniques to examine samples. Plant presses are also commonly used to preserve samples. A vast number of reference materials are often used to help identify samples.

Where do botanists work?

Botanists can work in a variety of different climates or locations depending on where they are conducting their research or fieldwork, from rainforests to deserts or even underwater. This will also be complemented by work in a laboratory.

Tertiary study

You could begin with a Bachelor of Science with a major in Plant Science.

You could then go on to continue your studies in areas including:

  • Master of Science (BioSciences)
  • Master of Science (Ecosystem Science)

Companies that employ botanists

Botany graduates are employed by:

  • Private sector consultants
  • The mining industry
  • Government departments (such as Agriculture and Food, Environment and Conservation)
  • Botanic gardens and research agencies that are interested in the environment, conservation, restoration and horticulture
  • Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning
  • CSIRO

botany careers

Careers in Botany

Careers in botany are rooted in a high regard for plant life. Jobs in this field center on the necessity of plants for our existence. Plant knowledge has broad applications for preserving human life and our natural world. Among them are finding medical cures, breeding hardy crops, and saving endangered plant species. With a bachelor’s degree in botany, here are exciting professions grounded in plant science.

1. Biotechnologist

This profession involves using live plants to design new biological products. Working in labs, biotechnologists conduct experiments, from which they develop materials. Inventions credited to these scientists are biofuels, medicines, bioplastics, and disease-resistant crops.

Employers seek candidates who are innovative, analytical, detail-minded, and articulate. College grads often start as research technicians. Job responsibilities involve setting up and maintaining lab equipment, recording data, and preparing reports. With experience, tasks can progress into designing the research that spawns new products.

Biotechnologists work for hospitals, pharmaceutical firms, genetic engineering companies, and food manufacturers. Houston Chronicle cites biotechnologist as one of the top careers in botany.

2. Florist

This job suits the botany grad with crafting skill and design talent. Florists artfully create flower arrangements, using fresh, dried, and artificial blooms. They tailor bouquets to a range of occasions, including weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, holidays, and graduations. Businesses hire florists to decorate their reception areas and conference rooms. Florists may also network with interior designers and wedding planners.

While designing bouquets, florists must also order stock and supplies. To draw clients, they fashion window and refrigerated displays. They help customers choose flowers, containers, and floral accessories. When closing sales, they tally purchases, handle payments, and issue receipts. 

To excel in this field, math and communication skills are required. A person must also be patient, polite, and congenial, even during busy holidays. Florists work at local shops, retail chains, and grocery stores. When seeking employment, it helps to have floral design certification and accreditation.

3. Plant Geneticist

Also termed “plant breeder,” this profession specializes in crop cultivation. Plant geneticists improve the value of edible plants regarding nutrition, flavor, appearance, yield, and hardiness. Working in laboratories, they upgrade existing crops and birth new plant varieties.

Responsibilities include implementing research goals, plant cross-pollination, gene isolation, breeding, recordkeeping, and research publication. The tasks of a plant geneticist require being organized, analytical, detail-minded, and articulate. Even at the entry level, this is one of the most well-paid careers in botany. Plant breeders are hired by seed companies, food producers, universities, research firms, and government departments.

4. Field Botanist

The heart of this profession is hands-on plant care. Field botanists engage in plant propagation, growth, and cultivation, both in the laboratory and outdoors. They help to invent new medicines and optimize crop production. They also identify invasive plants that threaten native species.

At a school, a field botanist may develop a horticulture curriculum or on-site garden, along with training students in plant care. At a research center, field botanists are tasked with finding new scientific uses for plants. They’re also employed by arboretums, botanic gardens, conservatories, medical labs, state and national parks, and science journals.

For job success, a candidate needs in-depth knowledge of plant physiology, statistics, and calculus. They must also be adaptable and articulate. Since field botanists draft surveys, manuscripts, grant applications, and research projects, they need strong writing skills. For the college grad with the proverbial green thumb, this is one of the most fulfilling careers in botany.

5. Naturalist

Naturalists raise environmental awareness through education. In creative ways, they foster in people an appreciation for nature. They also teach how to protect the ecosystems of parks, rivers, forests, and wetlands. Through lectures and tours, a naturalist explains the effects of human activities on the environment. The scientist also teaches about climatic change, weather patterns, and safeguarding wild plants and animals.

Naturalists make learning fun. For young people, they lead educational games, rock climbs, and forest hikes. They spearhead efforts to clean up rivers and parks. They also design engaging interpretative programs. Naturalists are hired by government departments, state parks, and environmental groups. On a contract basis, they work as consultants to non-profit organizations, scientific firms, and government agencies.

To teach effectively, a naturalist must be enthusiastic and articulate, with leadership skills. For the college grad who enjoys sharing a love of nature and being outdoors, naturalist is one of the most rewarding careers in botany.

Plant Champions

Careers in botany spotlight the innovative use of plants to improve human well-being. Some jobs entail environmental protection. Five meaningful professions in this field are biotechnologist, florist, plant geneticist, field botanist, and naturalist. Driven by a deep respect for plant life, these dedicated scientists protect our precious Earth.

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